Discrimination causes controversy at “True Eagle Night”, draws GSA’s criticism

The Gibby Rock in front of the JLSC building has a long reputation of being spray painted and being the place where couples can exchange a kiss over on True Eagle Night. However couples of the same sex seemed to be excluded from the getting any recognition on the most resent festivities.

Image

This archived article was written by: Nick Critchlow

The Gibby Rock in front of the JLSC building has a long reputation of being spray painted and being the place where couples can exchange a kiss over on True Eagle Night. However couples of the same sex seemed to be excluded from the getting any recognition on the most resent festivities.
The purpose of True Eagle is for students to come and enjoy certain festivities that ASCEU is putting on and one of those festivities is to kiss over the Gibby Rock. In order to become a True Eagle, the couple must kiss at Gibby under a full moon. Once you have done this, you get a T-shirt and the title of “True Eagle”.
On the night of True Eagle, couples exchanged kisses until a couple of students’ shows of affection made ASCEU a bit uneasy. Two female students from the Elmo club gave each other a friendly kiss over the rock.
Though the females are not a “couple” and only did it for fun, ASCEU refused to give them a True Eagle title or T-shirt. Also two male students, who actually were a couple kissed, over the rock and were refused in the same manner.
Apparently, a person in ASCEU had told the others that they were opposed to giving the title to same-sex couples, because traditionally it has always been given to opposite-sex couples.
In fear of being ridiculed by students who support gay rights, Student Body President Colby Majors says “I don’t want people to think that I am against this, especially the GSA (Gay-Straight Alliance). I am sorry if I have offended anyone and want everyone to know that I wanted this event to be for everyone and did not want anyone excluded.”
The GSA is a group for gay and straight students on campus who discuss and advocate gay-related issues. Jennifer Truschka is the advisor to the group.
“One thing that they need to do if they are going to turn people away, they [ASCEU] need to have a set policy: the purpose of this ritual or event, who is able to participate in it and acknowledge what it symbolizes. Then they will be able to do it and accept it,” says Trushcka