Out with the old, in with the new

Andrew Hardman hails from West Jordan, where he attended Copper Hills High School.
Hardman had never heard of the College of Eastern Utah until he attended a College Day at his school. He met with the people representing CEU and planned a visit. When he came it “felt right” to him, where other places didn’t. He applied for admission and was accepted. Hardman didn’t have any friends or buddies to come with him; he just came “cold turkey”.
His roommate was an ambassador who helped him become involved on campus. He had a blast doing so and learned to love the school.

This archived article was written by: Brianna Johnson

Andrew Hardman hails from West Jordan, where he attended Copper Hills High School.
Hardman had never heard of the College of Eastern Utah until he attended a College Day at his school. He met with the people representing CEU and planned a visit. When he came it “felt right” to him, where other places didn’t. He applied for admission and was accepted. Hardman didn’t have any friends or buddies to come with him; he just came “cold turkey”.
His roommate was an ambassador who helped him become involved on campus. He had a blast doing so and learned to love the school.
Hardman attended during the school year of 2004-2005, then left to serve an LDS mission. He returned to enroll in spring semester of 2008.
When Hardman was asked why he decided to run for president, he came up with five reasons: he loves the school, wants to serve the school, had experiences that prepared him to take on the office and has ideas for improvement “they would come to me in the morning, the middle of the day, right before I went to bed … I was always thinking about it” and just because “it clicked.”
Hardman went into more detail about what he wants to do this year as student body president, but in “broad strokes”.
First he wants to get people invested in the school, by being involved in clubs or being on committees. “It becomes worthwhile, meaningful and successful when many people become invested in a cause.” Hardman believes that cause is encouraging people to be more involved with the school.
Second, he wants to unify the school. He believes this can be done by taking the energy from student government and helping others change how they feel about the school, encouraging them to love it. “The student body picks up vibes and emotions,” Hardman states, “it’s our job to send out positive ones.” He believes that by doing so, enrollment and retention will be increased.
Third, he believes that there needs to be more recognition given to people on campus. “We have amazing, successful teachers, faculty and students.” He hopes to give them the recognition they deserve, by making others aware of their accomplishments. “I want to increase the communication tenfold.”
Fourth, he wants to create a greater connection between the San Juan campus in Blanding and the Price campus.
Fifth, Hardman believes that CEU has the potential to have the greatest enrollment of non-traditional students. He believes that if the community and families are offered activities where the school is given the chance to cater to them, it will increase interest and enrollment in the school.
Sixth, he wants to see clubs get bigger. He will propose to budget for more funding and support so that the clubs can become a main highlight of the school. If this happens, it will help with enrollment and retention, thus causing the institution to grow.
Seventh, he wants to provide solid proof of what CEU does and accomplishes, and of the lives it has changed. Hardman suggests that he will encourage students, faculty and staff to write letters about how CEU has helped them grow and learn. “I know my life has changed for the better by my attending school here.”
Hardman promises to put forth as much as effort as he can possibly muster into making “our” CEU the best school it can be.