Worst paying jobs

You want to become filthy rich. If you are the standard oxygen-breathing person, this applies to you. You have pondered from time to time the potential fast tracks to this lofty state of wealth and income. Many of you may have even found fortune in the money-making business. For those on campus who have yet to decide on their ideal vocation and make definitive educational goals, the most recent Payscale survey may offer some insights.

This archived article was written by: Seth Richards

You want to become filthy rich. If you are the standard oxygen-breathing person, this applies to you. You have pondered from time to time the potential fast tracks to this lofty state of wealth and income. Many of you may have even found fortune in the money-making business. For those on campus who have yet to decide on their ideal vocation and make definitive educational goals, the most recent Payscale survey may offer some insights.
The Payscale annual survey found the top-ten bachelor’s degrees for financial prosperity to be in 2011, in order from lowest to highest paying: petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering, computer engineering, physics, applied mathematics, computer science and nuclear engineering.
The lowest paying degrees on the other hand were found to be, in order from highest to lowest paying: art, public health, athletic training, theology, recreation and leisure studies, special education, culinary arts, social work, elementary education, and child and family studies.
Only seven percent of students who took part in a survey on campus expressed an intention to study within the top-ten fields. Twenty two percent had no definitive plans beyond their general education requirements. And a whopping 17 percent fell into the category of students studying the subjects marked as the lowest. All others who took part were significantly more centrally inclined.