SUNny opportunities

USU Eastern’s Serving Utah Network Center is involved in the success of USU Eastern Price campus students in more ways than many students realize. The SUN Center does not only provide volunteer service opportunities for students, but also provides service-learning class credit. They also work alongside professors to provide service-learning components within classes. Often students do not take advantage of these opportunities because they do not know what they are and what is beneficial about them.

This archived article was written by: Shanna Frame

USU Eastern’s Serving Utah Network Center is involved in the success of USU Eastern Price campus students in more ways than many students realize. The SUN Center does not only provide volunteer service opportunities for students, but also provides service-learning class credit. They also work alongside professors to provide service-learning components within classes. Often students do not take advantage of these opportunities because they do not know what they are and what is beneficial about them.
In general, service looks good on a resume. Those who volunteer and track their hours, can show employers their dedication and work ethic, and give themselves a step up above other applicants. If volunteers help with a project that is within their field of study or career, they are also able to gain hands-on experience. This helps in searching for a career path and applying for jobs. If 200 service hours are tracked and accomplished, students receive service cords at their graduation.
Volunteers can get more than cords, hands-on experience and resume builder. They can also get college credit. Volunteers that sign up for a service-learning course, receive one-college credit for every 18 hours of service they accomplish. They can take up to three service-learning credits per semester. Students must track their hours and write reflections about their volunteering experience.
Those that have a full schedule or do not have quite as much time to devote to service, have an alternate option. They can take classes with a service-learning component. The professors over these classes coordinate with the SUN Center to allow students to accomplish a certain amount of service hours as part of the students’ final grade in the class. The professors choose how the service will be evaluated within the class; which can be from an essay to a presentation.
The SUN Center is working to bring new opportunities to students so the college experience is fun and meaningful. They hope that their part of student life brings life experience and enthusiasm to Eastern students.
Some of SUN Center’s upcoming service opportunities are Kids @ Heart, every Monday through Thursday, from 11:30 a.m-12:45 p.m.; Green Team, every Tuesday at 3 p.m.; Breakaway Navajo Mountain and Breakaway Calexico, both are alternate spring break service opportunities; and Kids Valentine Carnival, Feb. 8, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. For information on upcoming events and to sign up, visit the SUN Center on the second floor of the Jennifer Levitt Student Center or call 435-613-5284.
SUN Center adviser, Terry Johnson said, “We most likely have a project that interests you. We look forward to receiving a call and seeing you in the SUN Center soon.”