News in Price, Utah

Emery County Administration Building Alive With Hundreds of Information Seekers

By Julie Johansen

Emery County Commissioners and the Emery County Public Lands Council hosted a public information meeting on Tuesday evening in the county administration building in Castle Dale. This meeting was requested by the OHV community at the commission meeting on Jan. 22. Hundreds of people filled the halls and three large rooms seeking information about the effects and parameters of the Emery Country Lands Bill.

Country officials filled the Swell Conference Room with tables upon which large maps showing the lands included in the land bill were placed. There was also a commissioner and/or land council member at each table to be of assistance in reading the maps or answering questions.

The Canyon Room and Emery County Commission Chambers had guest presenters who addressed the huge crowds and answered questions. During the first hour of the room rotations, David Orr and an assistant from the SITLA (State Institutional Trust Lands Administration) office were in the chambers. They had maps prepared to show the SITLA land exchanges included in the bill. The duo also explained the importance of the revenue from those lands to the schools of Utah. While some were afraid that the bill would eliminate mining in three of the land exchanges, Orr explained that the opposite would be true if the bill passes. The revenue from the SITLA land exchanges was one of the main things gained from the compromise on the bill in December because of the increase in mineral lease money the county and schools would receive from those exchanges, Orr said. His assistant director explained how the roads to the designated minerals extraction sites would be protected.

Romel Nicholas, former assistant to Senator Orrin Hatch, spoke and took inquiries in the Swell Room. He explained how the bill got to where it is now. He related that when Bears’ Ears National Monument was created, it became very evident that the San Rafael Swell was next on the list. When the previous PLI (Public Lands Initiative) was defeated, work increased on the Emery County Lands Bill.

“It became a model lands bill for other areas because it was so well written,” he said. It also became one of the main pieces of legislation that Sen. Hatch pushed to be enacted before his retirement at the end of 2018.

Nicholas explained the mandated steps required to become a piece of legislation, many different procedures and steps, and how the office and staff worked to push it forward because of its importance to Emery Country and all of Utah and even the Western United States. He stated that a monument has never been created over a piece of legislation designating public lands. The only thing that can stop an executive order is legislation by Congress.

Following the presentations, each presenter opened the floor for questions and answers. Then, the speakers changed rooms instead of the audiences due to the large crowd. Most questions were regarding recreation opportunities being curtailed, hunting, mineral extraction, handicapped accessibility, and road or trail closures. There were also concerns about the Bureau of Land management Travel Plan not being completed if the bill passes and what effect that will have on roads on the Swell. It was explained this will take place regardless of the bills status, but roads designated now as legal roads according to the BLM, are protected in the bill.

The meeting was scheduled for two hours, but because of the number of people, it went longer. A majority of the crowd was local OHV enthusiasts, but many came from much longer distances.

Savvy Senior: How to Save Money on Your Medication

Dear Savvy Senior,
I take several medications for multiple health conditions and the prices keep going up, even with insurance. Can you recommend any tips that can help me save?
Price-Gouged Patty

Dear Patty,

The rising cost of prescription drugs is a problem that stings millions of Americans. While there’s no one solution, there are some different strategies and resources that can help reduce your drug costs, so you can afford what you need. Here are several to consider.

If you have insurance, know your drug formulary: Most drug plans today have formularies (a list of medications they cover) that place drugs into different “tiers.” Drugs in each tier have a different cost. A drug in a lower tier will generally cost you less than a drug in a higher tier, and higher tier drugs may require you to get permission or try another medication first before you can use it.

To get a copy of your plan’s formulary, visit your drug plan’s website or call the 800 number on the back of your insurance card. Once you have this information, share it with your doctor so, if possible, he or she can prescribe you medications in the lower-cost tiers. Or, they can help you get coverage approval from your insurer if you need a more expensive drug.

You also need to find out if your drug plan offers preferred pharmacies or offers a mail-order service. Buying your meds from these sources can save you some money too.

Talk to your doctor: Ask your doctor if any of the medications you’re currently taking can be reduced or stopped. And, find out if the ones you are taking are available in generic form. About 80 percent of all premium drugs on the market today have a lower-cost alternative. Switching could save you between 20 and 90 percent.

Ask for a three-month prescription: This can be significantly cheaper for drugs you take long-term. If you use insurance, you’ll pay one co-pay rather than three.

Split your pills: Ask your doctor if the pills you’re taking can be cut in half. Pill splitting allows you to get two months’ worth of medicine for the price of one. If you do this, you’ll need to get a prescription from your doctor for twice the dosage you need.

Find and use online discounts: Start by trying GoodRx.com, BlinkHealth.com or WeRx.org. They will ask for the name of the drug, the dose, the number of pills, and where you live. Then they will show you what you can expect to pay at various pharmacies if you use their discount coupons or vouchers, which you can print out or download to your phone to show a pharmacist.

Pay cash: Most generic medications cost less if you don’t use your insurance. For example, chains like Target and Walmart offer discount-drug programs that sell generics for as little as $4 for a 30-day supply and $10 for a 90-day supply if you pay out-of-pocket. While some insurance companies charge a $10 copay for a 30-day supply.

Also ask your pharmacy if they offer a drug discount card program and compare costs with your insurance plan. You can also find free drug discount cards online at sites like NeedyMeds.org, which can be used at most U.S. pharmacies.

Shop online: You can also save by using an online pharmacy like HealthWarehouse.com but be sure to use an online retailer that operates within the U.S. and is licensed. The site should display the VIPPS symbol, which shows it’s a Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Site.

Search for drug assistance programs: If your income is limited, you can probably get help through drug assistance programs offered through pharmaceutical companies, government agencies and charitable organizations. To find these types of programs use sites like BenefitsCheckUp.org, PatientAdvocate.org, RxAssist.org and NeedyMeds.org.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Ice Skating Event Brings Awareness to Heart Health

Castleview Hospital, Carbon County Royalty and local residents kicked off Heart Health Awareness Month with a free ice skating event on Saturday.

Members of the community were welcomed to the Carbon County ice skating pond to take part in the event entitled “Ice Out Heart Disease.” Miss Carbon County Outstanding Teen Eminie Sherman joined with the local hospital to make the event possible.

Those in attendance were treated not only to free ice skating, but also chili and hot cocoa to warm their hands and bellies after a day on the ice.

“Thank you again to all who came and all who helped make this day possible,” hospital staff shared. “We encourage all Eastern Utah residents to stay active and reduce your risk of heart disease.”

Community Nursing Services Will Present at Next BEAR Meeting

BEAR Press Release

The speakers for the general Castle Country Business Expansion and Retention meeting on Feb. 14  will be Kimberly Dansie, the Vice President for Marketing and Sales for Community Nursing Services. She will be supported by Candice Bradly and Charity Kiahtipes. Community Nursing Services (CNS) provides Home Health and Hospice Care Services to patients and families in the comfort of their own homes. Helping people who have experienced illness or injury remain in their everyday environment safely and comfortably is their goal. They have been serving homes in Utah since 1928. The care team is comprised of a medical director, nurses, social workers, chaplains and aides. The presentation will take place at the Jennifer Leavitt Student Center Alumni Room and it will start at 8 a.m. and last about one hour. The public is welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

Helper Revitalization 2.0 Introduces 9 New Committees

The new year officially brought the launching of Helper Revitalization 2.0, a community-wide effort to advance the progress of Helper City.

Following the Community Economic Council workshop in Helper on Jan. 21, proactive community members entered another meeting for Helper Revitalization 2.0. During this meeting, attendees were briefed on nine new committees that will compose the efforts to revitalize the city.

Helper Revitalization was organized two years ago and is co-chaired by Helper City Mayor Lenise Peterman and Councilwoman Malarie Matsuda. Shortly after the formation of the organization, a grant was secured by Peterman through the American Institute of Architects for a community assessment. This allowed for roughly $200,000 in professional services to be provided to the city through the Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) program. This brought a team of architects, engineers and others to Helper to join with over 200 community members to develop a road map for Helper to become a sustainable community.

The assessment focuses on the area from R&A Market to Pick & Rail and from the railroad to the river. The SDAT team, alongside community members, worked to develop ideas for the city to improve, including projects such as placemaking, activating alleyways, beautification, pop-up stores and more. Projects thus far have resulted in beautification of the area, installation of language plaques, a new boulder playground near the riverwalk, wayfinding signage, installation of benches and much more.

Since that time, Helper Revitalization team members have been working toward some of these projects presented by the SDAT team as well as goals of their own. Now, the revitalization team is reorganizing its structure to become even more effective moving forward. As part of this, nine new committees, outlined below, have been formed to work on direct, impactful projects to improve the cities.

Social Media – The social media committee is led by Kylie Ockey and Malarie Matsuda. This committee will bring broader awareness to events, businesses and outdoor recreation opportunities in Helper. Committee members will encourage the use of the #itshappeninginhelper hashtag as well as develop creative strategies to encourage event participants, tourists and locals to post on their social media accounts about Helper.

Trails and Recreation – Fuzzy Nance is spearheading the Trails and Recreation Committee. The committee will be cooperating with Helper City, various government agencies, local businesses and community volunteers to spearhead the maintenance of existing trails, the building of new trails for walking, hiking and biking, and creating trail maps for locals and tourists. The planning and coordination of races and events will also be a focus of the committee along with determining locations for public campgrounds and coordinating efforts to build them. Learn more about the committee on its Facebook page. 

Main Street Activation/Utilization Malarie Matsuda is the lead of this committee, which will work to coordinate several small projects to be placed throughout Main Street to create fun, free experiences for locals and visitors. Project ideas include old-fashioned, yard-type games for the Main Street Park, Helper-themed photo opportunities, coordinating music in the park, informational kiosks, installing bike racks and more.

Public Art Installations – This committee will be led by Mrs. Mike O’Shea. The Public Art Installations Committee will identify areas throughout Helper City for the placement of public art projects. Committee members will connect with local artists, schools and organizations to create and install public works of art. The committee will bring their suggestions and recommendations for project ideas to the Helper City Council for final approval before the projects are executed.

Historical Oversight – Dr. Tim Riley will spearhead this committee. The Historical Oversight Committee will lead projects that relate to and protect the history of Helper. This committee will also be tasked with seeing through the historical preservation ordinance. The development of a walking tour to highlight historic buildings and business on the city’s Main Street would also be a project undertaken by this committee.

Rio Theatre Crew – Ryan Piccolo will oversee the Rio Theatre Crew, which will help book events at the theatre. During the events, the team will assist with the needed operations, sound, lighting, greeting, concessions and clean up.

Community Outreach – This committee will be led by Michelle Goldsmith. The Community Outreach Committee will help with delivering information to the community about events and meetings as well as gather feedback when necessary. The committee will aim to reach the populations that do not use email or social media.

Business Alliance – Cindy Lund will lead this committee. The Business Alliance committee will work to continue the efforts of camaraderie between Helper businesses. Other efforts from the committee will revolve around pooling resources to advertise, working with local government, finding resources to improve signage and aiming to improve internet presence. This committee will also network regularly to learn more about programs, grants, ideas and issues. The Business Alliance committee will also work in conjunction with the Community Economic Council to benefit Helper. To learn more, please join the Helper Business Alliance Facebook group. 

Community Spirit Recognition – Tonia Olsen will oversee the Community Spirit Recognition Committee. This committee will be tasked with recognizing homes/yards throughout Helper City that display holiday spirit and pride in their yards. Committee members will coordinate with local media and present certificates and yard signs to residents.

In conjunction with the nine committees, fundraising for the revitalization of Helper City will continue through the efforts of Mayor Lenise Peterman, who will actively seek grants and other sources of funding for city projects.

While there are multiple committees to be involved in, Matsuda of Helper Revitalization stressed that volunteers do not need to sign up for every committee, or even every project for a certain committee.

“You can give as much or as little as possible,” Matsuda said.

Matsuda has been with Helper Revitalization since its inception, seeing its growth not only on a community level, but on a personal level.

“I have been able to meet new people and make connections with people that I wouldn’t have otherwise,” she said. “It has given me a greater sense of community and purpose, and it has been very fulfilling.”

Matsuda stressed that volunteers do not need to be Helper residents to get involved. Anyone who wants to be a part of the city’s revitalization are encouraged to volunteer.

“I just want to encourage anyone who wants to get involved to do it. Reach out,” Matsuda concluded. “It is a fun group of passionate people. Everyone is really supportive of each other. It is fun to be a part of Helper’s revival. There is such a sense of camaraderie.”

To stay up to date on Helper Revitalization, follows its Facebook group or email [email protected] to receive updates or volunteer.

 

 

 

Falling Rock Totals Car in Price Canyon

A falling rock totaled a vehicle in Price Canyon Sunday evening near Emma Park Road.

According to reports, the incident occurred when a driver was traversing Highway 6 though the canyon and a falling rock struck the vehicle.

It was reported that the rock was as big as a kitchen table, and part of it broke off and became lodged in the passenger seat. There were no passengers in the vehicle and no major injuries were reported as a result of the incident.

Utah Senator Pushes for Affordable Housing Assistance With SB34

Utah Senator Jake Anderegg

Experts have officially stated that Utah is facing a sizable affordable housing gap. This comes as no shock to many that are in the market and struggling for home-ownership.

In response, Utah Senator Jake Anderegg in sponsoring a bill, SB34, that is aimed at structuring a new incentive for cities to zone for affordable housing. This incentive urges city officials to choose two strategies out of a list of 25 that will welcome moderate-income housing.

If the two strategies are not chosen, it voids said officials and their communities of being eligible for a considerable amount (around 700 million) in annual state transportation investment funds.

These monies will be allocated primarily from the motor fuel tax that the state controls. Sen. Anderegg witnessed the bill pass through its first legislative test recently. When the Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee viewed SB34, it was met with unanimous approval.

A work product of the Utah Commission on Housing Affordability, SB34 grew from legislation that passed in 2018 that found a group of 20 housing experts, city representatives, state leaders and the like coming together to face the state’s issues with housing.

Sen. Anderegg’s bill would interact with the state’s Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, calling for $4 million in ongoing monies for the fund. Governor Gary Herbert had previously, in his budget, proposed that money in the millions be put into the Olene Walker fund. This money was called for not only one-time, but annually.

The Olene Walker fund is a state fund that is used for low-interest lending geared toward affordable housing construction. SB34 would also call for $20 million in one-time funding.

As it stands, the bill will now be presented to the full Senate for consideration. For more information on the bill and to follow its progression, please click here. 

Proposition 2 Compromise Expected to Remain Steady in 2019

Proposition 2, a medical marijuana initiative that would allow treatment in the state of Utah, was voted for in November of 2018.

With the voting of the bill came many that were opposed and many that were in favor. Medical marijuana has been used not to cure, but to assist in the treatment of serious medical conditions such as cancer, epilepsy and more.

A medical marijuana compromise was passed by Utah lawmakers in December that would ultimately replace the voter-approved initiative. Republican legislative announced that there is not intention to consider any major changes to the compromise this year.

This compromise will replace Proposition 2 with a more restrictive law for the use of medical marijuana in the state. This decision was made by the GOP-controlled legislature during a special session in December. This compromise was born out of discussion among the Utah House and Senate leaders.

The house and leaders were joined by the Utah Patients Coalition, Libertas Institute, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Utah Medical Association. Half of these groups were opposed to the bill while half were in favor. Also following the compromise, Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education (TRUCE) and the Epilepsy Association of Utah have sued the state of Utah in regards to the changing of the law.

While many Democrats were in opposition to the compromise, no bills were filed to restore the proposition before the legislature began its 45-day session that began last week. Only one bill has been introduced at this point, HB106, that was proposed by Representative Marsha Judkins.

HB106 requests to add autoimmune disorders to the list of conditions that qualify for treatment by medical marijuana. While those conditions were originally included in Prop. 2, they were then removed when the compromise was composed. Rep. Judkins stated that she proposed this bill when many came forward in distress over conditions such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis not being covered by the compromise.

Rep. Judkins acknowledges that there have been many discussions and changes that have gone into the compromise and the addition may open many discussions on additional conditions to the bill.

“I feel like most of the voters in Utah did vote for Prop. 2 with the expectation that these conditions would be covered,” Rep. Judkins said.

At this time, HB106 has not been approved or denied and while minor tweaks may be considered, the legislature will stand by their statement of not considering major changes for the 2019 year.

Old Church Closer to Restoration Following Emery Town Winter Ball

For another year, the Emery Town Winter Ball aimed to raise funds for the restoration of the old yellow church in Emery. This year’s successful event took place on Saturday as attendees gathered at the Emery Town Rec Center for an evening of music and dancing.

A couple from the Salt Lake Scandinavian Music and Dance organization were in attendance at the ball this year to perform and teach Scandinavian dance. Tom Oesleby and Gwen Trefts are leaders in the Salt Lake company. They helped form the organization after moving to Utah from Wyoming in 2006.

Their first event, The Scandi Jam 2010, was an afternoon workshop and evening party featuring Bob Holmen from Red Lodge, Wyo. with music by local musicians. This has grown to annual and semi-annual Scandi fests and other local heritage festivals. Oesleby and Trefts have studied under Norwegian and Swedish instructors and enthusiastically shared their talent at this year’s ball.

The event was organized by the Emery Historical and Restoration Committee as funds continue to be raised for the restoration of the church.

Early Morning Meeting Questions Support of EC Public Lands Bill

By Julie Johansen

The Emery County Commissioners called a special meeting Monday morning at 6:30 a.m. to reconsider their support for the Emery County Public Lands Bill. This decision was made on Saturday because the commissioners discovered that the bill could be on the Senate floor as early as Monday morning. Members of the OHV Club had requested more information and that reconsideration. Specifically, there were concerns about some roads in the southeastern portion of Emery County that the OHV Club was afraid would be closed as a result of the bill.

A standing-room-only crowd was in attendance with OHV groups from the Wasatch Front, surrounding counties and local citizens came to the meeting.

Commissioner Kent Wilson first addressed the original questions concerning the roads in question. The commissioners had met with the Bureau of Land management, and the roads are not currently designated roads, so the bill would not affect the status of those routes.

Each commissioner explained their decision to support the bill. All three commissioners stated that there are things in the bill that they are personally unhappy with, but they had to look at the good of the county as a whole in their final decision. There are three things that they felt made it necessary to make the compromise:

1. Stronger language for management and the addition of an advisory council for trails with local representation.
2. SITLA lands trades especially around some mineral extraction areas in Emery County, which could mean almost a large increase in mineral lease money for the county and additional revenue for schools in Utah.
3. Candland Mountain withdrawal from the proposed wilderness. This is important for watershed and mineral purposes.

So, the compromise was made in December.

Questions and concerns from the OHV groups, including the president of the Utah OHV Association, were road closures, stronger and more protective language for recreation areas, roads and trails on the desert, protection for future generations, and more wilderness designations. Members also wanted more transparency with regards to things of this nature.

Brock Johansen, CEO of Emery Telcom, spoke to the group as a concerned businessman and citizen. He reported that the only way to protect from a future executive order of a monument was to make legislation to protect the land. He reported that his family had fought for access to the Swell for at least three generations and, without legislation, a simple signature could take all that away, especially if there is a change in leadership at the national executive level. Johansen further explained that the bill did not lessen the right to use routes and would probably strengthen that right through the establishment of the advisory council because of how the boundaries had been developed. He asked the group to continue to fight by developing the current trails and developing a trail system through the proper process, and explained that Emery Telcom has been donating equipment to the county to help maintain the current routes. Johansen also explained that the Emery County Commission has consistently ran articles and information in the newspaper as well as streamed local meetings on television and online to keep the public informed.

Steve Hawkins, the President of the Utah ATV Association, stated that he was not pleased with everything in the bill but that it might be the best option, but that the real fight would be after passing the bill. He was nervous about wilderness designation next to current trails. He agreed that increased focus should be placed on trail maintenance and praised the commission and the Emery County Trails Committee. He stated that his association could be a great resource to Emery County in these efforts. Hawkins stressed that his association and the commission were not enemies and needed to work together.

After deliberation and considerable discussion, the motion was made to continue commission support of the lands bill. The motion passed unanimously.

To watch the meeting, please click here. Due to duration, the video has been separated into two parts.

Watkins Kicks Off 2019 Legislative Session With 3 Bills

Students from Carbon High visited Watkins for Utah History Day on the Hill on Thursday.

By Representative Christine Watkins

It was a very busy week for me at the legislature. I am on some new committees and I am getting up to speed with them.  I am vice-chair of the Business, Economic Development, and Labor Appropriation Subcommittee.  I am on the Education and Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee. I am also House chair of the Child Welfare Oversight Committee and a member of the Native American Liaison Committee.

I have filed a number of bills and three of them made it to committee. I was able to pass each of them out of committee and the next step is to pass them on the House Floor. I passed HB138, Special Designation of Route 6; HB84, Economic Development Programs Amendments; and HB104S01, Private Counselors Amendments. The Economic Bill fixes a part of last year’s bill that put a limitation on the amount BEAR (Business Expansion and Retention) grants can be funded. The cap was not put there by me and somehow, I missed that it was put in. It also shortens the time that a business that applies for a Rural Fast Track Grant has to prove success in their business. The time frame has been changed from two years to one.

The Private Counselors Amendment bill is a really important amendment to the Justice Reform Bill that was passed a few years ago. Currently, all counselors who have the appropriate license to work with people who have been court ordered to attend substance abuse or mental health counseling have to have a facility license. If the counselor works for a place like Four Corners, they don’t need to do this. But, if you are a private provider, you still have to get a facility license, which is time consuming and unnecessary. Judges were told to only allow people to go to a provider who have a facility license. This took many valid providers out of the loop and people were struggling getting into counselors. I thought this was a rural issue and had the bill written to include only counties of the third through sixth class. The assistant director for the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health contacted me and asked that the whole state be included in this change. He also helped clarify some of the language in the bill.  All three of the bills passed unanimously in committee and the counselor bill received praise for the change that it will make.

On Monday, I was the House Sponsor for S.C.R.2, a resolution recognizing and honoring Navajo Code Talkers. The Senate sponsor is Senator Jani Iwamoto. This resolution not only honors the Navajo Code Talkers, it names August 14, 2019, as Navajo Code Talkers Day. I am also the House Sponsor of Senator Iwamoto’s SB101, which designates a permanent Code Talker Day, and designates portions of Highways 162, 163, and 191 in San Juan County as the Navajo Code Talker Highway. I am very honored that Senator Iwamoto asked me to be her House Sponsor.

The Medicaid Expansion bill will probably come up for vote this week. I am currently not going to support any changes to what voters voted for. My district as whole voted for Proposition 3, which allowed the expansion. I will stand with my district in this decision.

My intern this year is Elliott Ramirez from Orem; she is currently a student at Southern Utah University. She is an energetic and very helpful young woman and I appreciate her help during the session.

Honored to be working for you; please stay in touch.

Cell: 435-650-1969,
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: Representative Christine Watkins District 69

Carbon County Jail Bookings January 28 – February 3

BASSO, AMANDA 1 29 2019 1802 DUI, SUSPENDED LICENSE, POSSESSION OF PARAPHERNALIA 29 PRICE ELDER, BRANDON 1 30 2019 1000 SEXUAL BATTERY, 72 HR HOLD 33 PRICE MCCORMACK, ERICH 1 30 2019 2006 72 HOUR HOLD, POSS. OF HEROIN (F3), POSS. OF PARAPHERNALIA 21 PRICE JONES, JASMINE 1 30 2019 2008 WARRANTS X2, RETAIL THEFT 37 PRICE KUTNYAK, JASON 1 30 2019 2140 STALKING (F3) 40 PRICE BOSCH, KEVIN 1 31 2019 932 COURT COMMITMENT 32 COLORADO FOX, DANIEL 1 31 2019 930 2 WARRANTS 20 CEDAR CITY HENDERSON, KRISTOPHER 1 31 2019 1147 2 WARRANTS 40 PRICE SAMPLES, BRANDON 1 31 2019 1703 72 HOUR HOLD 37 PRICE DAVIS, SHAWN 2 1 2019 100 3 DAY COMMIT 46 PRICE HARDMAN, CODY 2 1 2019 135 THEFT OF A VEHICLE, THEFT, POSS. PARAPHERNALIA, POSS OF BURGLARY TOOLS 33 WELLINGTON WOODY, SHAQUILLE 2 1 2019 1300 WARRANT 23 MOAB SALZETTI, BRYAN 2 1 2019 1639 WARRANT 54 HELPER AVERETT, ERIC 2 1 2019 1757 WARRANTS 32 CO. LEDUC, MARYANN 2 2 2019 1041 INTOXICATION 44 PRICE BOYCE, MICHAEL 2 2 2019 1252 WARRANT 45 HELPER CHAVEZ, JOHN 2 2 2019 2149 ASSAULT (DV) 41 PRICE JESSUP, ETHAN 2 2 2019 2350 WARRANTS X 6 19 PRICE WESTERLUND, JORDAN 2 3 2019 1251 HOLD FOR COURT 35 SPANISH FORK SWEARINGEN, JAMESON 2 3 2019 1500 HOLD FOR COURT 40 PRICE BELL, CAMREN 2 3 2019 1647 WARRANT 27 PRICE BONUALES, HEATHER 2 3 2019 1802 RETAIL THEFT 37 PRICE WALSWORTH, ROBERT 2 3 2019 2144 DUI, OPEN CONTAINER 28 PRICE

Representative Albrecht Reports on First Week of 2019 Legislative Session

By the Office of Representative Carl Albrecht

The 2019 Legislative Session commenced on Monday, Jan. 28.

On Tuesday, Representative Carl Albrecht presented his first bill, HB 110, to the House Economic Development and Workforce Services committee. It was passed unanimously and moved to the House Floor for consideration. This bill was heard by the House on Friday, where it also passed unanimously. This bill will now move to the Senate for consideration.

During the week, Representative Albrecht met in each of the committees he serves on, where he heard and debated bills that will be coming to the House in the following weeks. He serves on the following committees:

  • House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee as Chair
  • House Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee
  • Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands
  • Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environmental Quality Appropriations Subcommittee
  • Clean Air Review Policy Board (to review clean air bills to make sure we get “bang for the buck”)

Representative Albrecht is involved the Rural Caucus where he serves as co-chair with Representative Wilde and Senators Hinkins and Sandall. He also participates with the Sportsman and Conservative Caucuses.

Representative Albrecht also met with and delivered a message to a group of fifth grade students from Pahvant Elementary in Richfield on Tuesday. They were taken on a tour of the Capitol and recognized on the House Floor.

On Wednesday, Representative Albrecht filmed a segment for The County Seat, which will air on Feb. 2 at 11 p.m. and Feb. 3 at 8:30 a.m. and can be found on The County Seat’s YouTube channel. He also spoke with a Price radio station on Thursday morning at 7:30 a.m. and Richfield’s radio station Friday morning.

Representative Albrecht is currently sponsoring the following bills:

  • HB 78 – Federal Designations
    • Requires a governmental entity that is advocating for a federal designation within the state to bring the proposal to the Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Interim Committee for review
  • HB 110 – Rural Economic Development Incentives
    • A modification of 2018’s HB 390 which authorized a rural employment expansion grant to businesses for the creation of new jobs in fourth, fifth or sixth class counties. HB 110 will raise the maximum total incentive amount a business can apply for from $25,000 to $250,000.
  • HB 125 – Quantity Impairment Modifications
    • Makes a one-word change to code dealing with water diversion applications
  • HB 175 – Transportation of Veterans to Memorials Support Special Group License Plate
    • Creates a special group license plate to support programs to transport veterans to Washington D.C. to visit veterans’ memorials
  • HB 220 – Radioactive Waste Amendment
    • Would allow low-level radioactive waste to be classified at the time of acceptance. Before any waste is received it would have to receive approval from Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control (DWMRC).
  • Two other bills are in the drafting stage, one dealing with rural online working hubs and one on public safety code amendments.

The following is a letter from Representative Carl Albrecht:

As you heard in the Governor’s address, a $225 million tax cut is proposed, which would reduce income tax and sales tax. There is also a proposal to tax services in an effort to broaden the base. There are many options out there at this point. I will keep you informed as this moves forward. I fear there will be winners and losers with a tax on services, so I need to hear more from the Revenue of Tax Committee.

I have also received many comments on Proposition 3, Expansion of Medicaid, both for and against. I have also heard from constituents who strongly support ensuring the state remains financially whole. I’ll keep you informed as this discussion progresses.

As always, I appreciate hearing your comments. Please call, text or email me or my intern Rachel Brown. Thank you for the opportunity to represent you.

Contact me:
Representative Albrecht
[email protected]
435-979-6578

Rachel Brown
[email protected]
385-479-0815

Utah Coal Country Strike Team’s Proposal to Help Rural Counties Moves Ahead in National American Dream Competition

Press Release

The Utah Coal Country Strike Team’s multi-pronged proposal to boost financial prosperity in Carbon and Emery counties resonated with the Alliance for the American Dream on Tuesday, earning it one of five spots in the final pitch competition this summer.

The economic vitality that has brought Utah national recognition has bypassed the two counties, where economic conditions have steadily declined since 2001 with falling coal production and coal mine closures.

Utah Coal Country Strike Team’s plan targets four interventions to aid the economically distressed communities:
• Create a Silicon Slopes Eastern hub to complement Utah’s rapidly expanding tech sector;
• Build a tourism infrastructure;
• Revitalize housing stock to increase wealth and create a more attractive community; and
• Establish customized economic incentives to spur development in the counties.

“We’ve all benefited from coal, but we face an economic, environmental and moral imperative to combat global climate change,” said Natalie Gochnour, one of the team’s co-chairs and director of the Gardner Policy Institute. “The benefits of reducing our dependence on coal are widespread, but the costs of doing that are not. Nowhere is this more evident than in Utah’s coal country and other coal dependent regions in the U.S.”

While job growth statewide has increased 17 percent since 2008, employment in Utah’s coal country has declined 16 percent; unemployment is 5 percent, double the state’s rate.

“The Utah Coal Country Strike Team came up with an innovative, genuine partnership that has the highest potential to transform lives,” said U President Ruth Watkins. “The University of Utah is 100 percent behind this endeavor, which addresses one of our country’s most overlooked yet pressing issues.”

The Utah Coal Country Strike Team pulled together representatives from state and local government, education and business. Among them: Price Mayor Mike Kourianos, who helped present the plan to the screening committee.

“This complements my vision for Price, and all of Utah coal country, to diversify the economy, invest in infrastructure and give us a path to future,” Kourianos said. “This is about our future, keeping our children and grandchildren in our community.”

Schmidt Futures founded the Alliance for the American Dream in April 2018 and selected four public universities to vet ideas aimed at raising net income for 10,000 middle-class families in their communities by 10 percent by the end of 2020.

Twelve teams from the four states—Utah, Arizona, Ohio and Wisconsin—shared their ideas during a pitch competition Tuesday at the downtown Phoenix campus of Arizona State University.

A national panel of 10 screeners with extensive experience across the private, public and nonprofit sectors evaluated each pitch. The screeners selected finalists based on their interdisciplinary approach, technical components and focus on inclusion for diverse communities.

Other finalists include Arizona State University’s proposal to improve access to federal student financial aid; The Ohio State University’s proposal to aid first-time home buyers; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s proposals for a legal intervention program and to improve child care services.

The teams selected on Tuesday, which are vying for up to $1 million in funding from Schmidt Futures, will now work to refine their ideas before facing a final evaluation this summer.

Two other teams from Utah—Mobility as a Service and Neighbor—also made pitches in the national round.

Neighbor allows people with unused storage space to make money by renting that space to people with storage needs; renters save money over costs of traditional self-storage. Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is a collaboration between the Utah Transit Authority, the Utah Department of Transportation and Salt Lake City to decrease transportation costs by enabling households with multiple cars to get by with one less vehicle through seamless access to alternative transportation services.

The three teams emerged as the top contenders in the University of Utah’s American Dream Ideas Challenge, which attracted more than 150 proposals.

“This grand challenge sparked unprecedented collaboration and innovation from various individuals and communities in Utah,” said Courtney McBeth, director of the U’s American Dream Ideas Challenge. “We’ve been struck by the level of engagement and quality of proposals and look forward running next year’s challenge. We sincerely appreciate Schmidt Futures’ vision in bringing together public universities in an alliance to strengthen the middle class.”

New Pharmacy Opens in Huntington

By Patsy Stoddard

The SmartHealth Pharmacy is now open in Hometown Market in Huntington.

Kendall and Amanda O’Neil are the business owners. The pharmacy boasts a drive-up window, which will be open soon. Customers can come into the pharmacy as well. It iss located on the south side of the store by the bakery and deli area. The pharmacy is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Kendall said the pharmacy accepts all types of insurance and they can help customers with prescription transfers from other pharmacies.


The Emery County Business Chamber welcomed the business into Emery County with a ribbon cutting outside the pharmacy. The Miss Emery Royalty was on hand to help welcome the new business.

Tom and Kristen Potter are the owners of Hometown Market and they expressed their appreciation for the new business locating within Hometown Market. Huntington City Council members Lesa Miller, Joe Ward and Jerry Livingston attended the ribbon cutting to welcome the O’Neils to the Huntington business community.

Emery County Jail Bookings January 10-29

DATE NAME CHARGE 1/10/19 MCGINLEY, MATTHEW CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION MARIJUAN, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION, DUI ALCOHOL OR DRUGS, NA – SEX OFFENSE, TRESSPASSING 1/12/19 JENSEN, KIERSTEN 1/10/19 BREWSTER, KEVIN W CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION MARIJUANA, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION X3, WARRANT ARREST 1/10/19 HOWELL, JEFFREY ANIMAL PROBLEM 1/11/19 GUYMON, CRAIG NA-FRAUD, TRAFFIC OFFENSE 1/11/19 PITTMAN, WILLIAM WARRANT ARREST X3 1/12/19 CERINI, JOSHUA CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION 1/12/19 BARNEY, MALENA CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION 1/13/19 GUZMAN, WILLIAM WARRANT ARREST X3 1/14/19 BAIRD, JAMIE TRAFFIC OFFENSE X3, WARRANT ARREST X2 1/14/19 DEYTON, FRANCES CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION 1/14/19 AYALA, JOSE NA – SEX OFFENSE, WARRANT ARREST 1/14/19 BARTH, MISTY CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION X2, THEFT, WARRANT ARREST X2 1/14/19 JACKSON, MICHAEL WARRANT ARREST X2 1/17/19 SWEARINGEN, JAMESON WARRANT ARREST X2 1/17/19 TUTTLE, CASEY WARRANT ARREST X3 1/18/19 MILLER, CAMERON PROBATION/PAROLE VIOLATION 1/18/19 SPEARS, ZACHARY TRAFFIC OFFENSE 1/19/19 ROBERTS, DONA WARRANT ARREST 1/19/19 PITTMAN, REBECCA WARRANT ARREST 1/22/19 ROMERO-AGUIRRE, URIEL CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION 1/22/19 JUSTESEN, REBECCA ASSAULT, SIMPLE 1/22/19 BROWN, KELLAR ALCOHOL OFFENSE X2, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION, DUI ALCOHOL OR DRUGS 1/22/19 FISH, THOMAS DUI ALCOHOL OR DRUGS, TRAFFIC OFFENSE 1/23/19 MERTES, COLYN COMMUNICATIONS OFFENSE 1/23/19 WILSTEAD, TRENT WARRANT ARREST 1/23/19 BRINKERHOFF, JAMES WARRANT ARREST, WEAPONS OFFENSE 1/29/19 DEBRUYN, TERESA CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION, DUI ALCOHOL OR DRUGS

BLM Releases Sale Notice for March 2019 Oil and Gas Lease Sale

BLM Press Release

SALT LAKE CITY— The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)’s Utah State Office today released the March 2019 Notice of Competitive oil and gas lease sale list, which includes 156 parcels totaling about 217,476 acres. The sale is scheduled to occur online at www.energynet.com on March 25-26, 2019.

The sale notice, environmental review documents and additional information, including protest instructions for the March oil and gas lease sale, can be viewed online at https://go.usa.gov/xEDtT. The Utah State Office will also have this information available. Publication of this sale notice starts a 30-day protest period that closes at 4:30 p.m. on March 1, 2019.

Protests need to be as specific and substantive as possible. Those protests that contain only opinions or preferences will not receive a formal response, but may be considered in the BLM decision-making process. All protests must be submitted via U.S. mail addressed to the BLM-Utah State Office at 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, UT 84101; in person to the Utah State Office, or via fax to the attention of Sheri Wysong at (801) 539-4237. For information on how to file a timely protest, please refer to the March 2019 NCLS at https://go.usa.gov/xEDtb.

Leasing is the first step in the process to develop federal oil and gas resources. Before development operations can begin, an operator must submit an application for permit to drill (APD) detailing development plans. The BLM reviews APDs, posts them for public review and coordinates with state partners and stakeholders.

For additional information about oil and gas leasing in Utah, please contact Sheri Wysong at (801) 539-4067. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to leave a message or question with the above individual.  The FRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

One-Day Event Raises Funds for Carbon County Animal Shelter

Miss Carbon County Gracie Steele wears one of the t-shirts that was available during the fundraiser. 

A one-day fundraiser organized by Aajah Breinholt raised $176.26 for the Carbon County Animal Shelter on Saturday.

For the online fundraiser, two t-shirts were available for purchase, one bearing the title “Dog Mom” and the other saying “Life is Better With Fur Babies.” A limited amount of shirts were available for purchase and all of the proceeds from the fundraiser were given to the local shelter.

“We would like to give a huge shout out to Aajah Brienholt,” staff from the center shared. “We are so humbled by her donation.”

Following a complete sell out of t-shirts, the animal shelter was presented with the funds.

 

Savvy Senior: What You Should Know About Your Aging Parents’ Finances

Dear Savvy Senior,
My siblings and I don’t know much about our elderly parent’s financial situation or their wishes if something happens to them. When mom broke her hip last year, it got me thinking we need to be better prepared. What’s the best way to handle this, and what all should we know?
Tentative Daughter

 

Dear Tentative,

Many adult children don’t know much about their elderly parent’s financial situation or end-of-life plans, but they need to. Getting up to speed on their finances, insurance policies, long-term care plans and other information is important because some day you might have to help them handle their financial affairs or care, or execute their estate plan after they die. Without this information, your job becomes much more difficult. Here are some tips that can help.

Have the Conversation

If you’re uncomfortable talking to your parents about this topic, use this column as a prompt or start by talking about your own finances or estate plan as a way to ease into it.

Also see TheConversationProject.org, which offers free kits that can help you kick-start these discussions.

It’s also a good idea to get your siblings involved too. This can help you head off possible hard feelings, plus, with others involved, your parents will know everyone is concerned.

When you talk with your parents, you’ll need to collect some information, find out where they keep key documents and how they want certain things handled when they die or if they become incapacitated. Here’s a checklist of areas to focus on.

PERSONAL & HEALTH INFORMATION

  • Contacts: Make a list of names and phone numbers of their doctors, lawyer, accountant, broker, tax preparer, insurance agent, etc.
  • Medical information: Make a copy of their medical history (any drug allergies, past surgeries, etc.) and a list of medications they take.
  • Personal documents: Find out where they keep their Social Security card, marriage license, military discharge papers, etc.
  • Secured places: Make a list of places they keep under lock and key or protected by password, such as online accounts, safe deposit boxes, safe combination, security alarms, etc.
  • Pets: If they have a pet, what are their instructions for the animal’s care?
  • End of life: What are their wishes for organ or body donation, and their funeral instructions? If they’ve made pre-arrangements with a funeral home, get a copy of the agreement.

LEGAL DOCUMENTS

  • Will: Do they have an updated will or trust, and where is it located?
  • Power of attorney: Do they have a power of attorney document that names someone to handle their financial matters if they become incapacitated?
  • Advance directives: Do they have a living will and a medical power of attorney that spells out their wishes regarding their end-of-life medical treatment? If they don’t have these documents prepared, now’s the time to make them.

FINANCIAL RECORDS

  • Debts and liabilities: Make a list of any loans, leases or debt they have – mortgages owed, car loans, medical bills, credit card debts. Also, make a list of all their credit and charge cards, including the card numbers and contact information.
  • Financial accounts: Make a list of the banks and brokerage accounts they use (checking, savings, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, etc.) and their contact information.
  • Company benefits: Make a list of any retirement plans, pensions or benefits from their former employers including the contact information of the benefits administrator.
  • Insurance: Make a list of the insurance policies they have (life, long-term care, home, auto, Medicare, etc.) including the policy numbers, agents and phone numbers.
  • Property: Make a list of the real estate, vehicles or other properties they own, rent or lease and where they keep the deeds, titles and loan or lease agreements.
  • Taxes: Find out where they keep copies of past year’s tax returns.

For more tips, see the Eldercare Locator publication “Let’s Talk: Starting the Conversation about Health, Legal, Financial and End-of-Life Issues” at N4A.org/files/Conversations.pdf.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Pages