News in Price, Utah

Let There Be Music

A combined choral effort brought sweet sounds to the Geary Events Center on Saturday as Dr. Craig Jessop conducted a choir of USU Eastern and community singers.

Accompanied by Elise Tuttle, community instrumentalists and USU Logan music faculty, the free concert, entitled “Let There Be Music,” brought together many talents under Jessop’s direction.

Dr. Jessop is the Dean of The Caine College of the Arts for all USU campuses, a title he will maintain throughout the end of this school year before stepping down. He is well known for his many years as director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir (now called the Tabernacle Choir on Temple Square). Adding to his impressive resume are auditions won at the Metropolitan Opera and San Francisco Operas.

“His decades of experience directing some of the most elite choirs and bands across the United States and Germany make him famous and have resulted in the most coveted music awards,” event organizers shared prior to the event. “His work as a much sought after guest conductor have taken him to the most prestigious concert halls around the world.”

Saturday’s concert came after a lecture on Thursday entitled “The Power of Music.” Dr. Jessop’s lecture was open to the university as well as the community. His visit to Price also included two days of workshops and rehearsals, culminating with the free performance.

The performance included two combined choir selections by John Rutter, “For the Beauty of the Earth” and “All Things Bright and Beautiful.” They also sang a spiritual, “Let Me Fly,” arranged by Robert DeCormier, and two Mack Wilberg arrangements of “Cindy” and “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” The concert featured musical selections by the Logan Canyon Winds Ensemble and a solo performance on the university’s new Steinway concert grand piano.

Gallery East Welcomes Photographer Jason Huntzinger

USU Eastern hosted a classical evening of chatter and art on Friday as Jason Huntzinger was welcomed to showcase his art to those who came to admire. There was quiet music and refreshments among the pictures, which were available for admiration and purchase.

Huntzinger has been working on variations of light and dark with his photography for 20 years. Many of those years were spent in Minnesota, where he received his bachelors degree in fine arts. He had a high photography emphasis with his degree. Huntzinger mentioned that the series of photographs presented at the gallery were created throughout the summer of 2018. It included pictures from the Helper River Walk.

A resident of Helper for the past four years, Huntzinger is an adjunct professor in USU Eastern’s art department and director of the Western Mining and Railroad Museum in Helper.

He has shown his work in Minneapolis, Seattle and several other locations with his work part of private collections throughout the world.

This exhibit of photos will be displayed from Jan. 8 through Feb. 2. The doors of the East Gallery are open to the public during the academic year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, closed on weekends and holidays.

7 County Infrastructure Coalition Elects Commissioner Lynn Sitterud as Co-Chairman, Commissioner Hopes Represents Carbon County as Board Member

By Britlie Sharp

On Friday, Jan. 11, the Seven County Infrastructure Coalition hosted its first meeting of the year. At this meeting, there were several changes to the board. Emery County Commissioner Lynn Sitterud was elected as one of the co-chairs of the coalition along with Commissioner Brad Horrocks of Uintah County. Commissioner Casey Hopes became the new member representing Carbon County on the board.

The Seven County Infrastructure Coalition consists of seven local counties: Daggett, Uintah, Duchesne, Sevier, Carbon, Emery and San Juan. Coalition members meet monthly to plan and carry out projects that are beneficial to the counties in the coalition, and normally, the meetings are held in Carbon County.

“The co-chairs work hand-in-hand with the Executive Director to carry out the wishes and direction of the board,” said Commissioner Sitterud. There are several projects the coalition is working on right now. The largest one is a new railroad that will be coming out of the Basin. Commissioner Sitterud stated that there is a project going before the State Legislature in the next two months that would bring economic growth to Emery and Carbon counties. “It is exciting as commissioners to represent our counties in the coalition and see the possible projects that we will be working on for our constituents,” Sitterud said.

Commissioner Casey Hopes said he will be able to help guide the general direction of the coalition and the projects it pursues as a board member and believes Carbon County gains a greater ability to accomplish its goals by being involved in the coalition. Commissioner Hopes feels the Coalition is important because, “each of our county’s economies are interdependent on each other, and many of the participating counties share infrastructure that connects those economies.”

“The work of the coalition is to try and help these natural resources [like oil and coal] get to market to help each of the economies in their respective counties,” Hopes continued. Since Commissioner Hopes has not been a part of the board for long, he is excited to learn more about the projects the coalition is undertaking. He is also interested in helping the Basin get their oil to market, which could possibly help the economy in the local area grow as well. “An example of this is the rail load out facilities in Wellington (PRT) and on Ridge Road at Savage,” he said.

The Seven County Infrastructure Coalition is working to bring benefits to all its member counties. By joining efforts through the coalition, the counties have a stronger ability to accomplish goals and complete projects that will improve local economies and infrastructure.

Mental Health and Stability Depend on Positive Action

BEAR Press Release

Much of the world, as well as the local community, have a view of mental illness that is not realistic or accurate. That was the message from two individuals who deal with people with mental illness in the local community at the Castle Country Business Expansion and Retention general board meeting on Jan. 17.

Sabrina Carter is a family nurse practitioner who specializes in mental health wellness and Zena Robinson is a social worker specializing in life coaching at a firm in Price called Positive Pathways. For both, what they do is help people to be all they can be, both in their lives and in the community.

They also reminded people that mental illness is not something to be shunned aside or ignored, but that it should be taken just as seriously as any physical ailment may be.

“Mental health care in our community has some barriers,” said Carter, who is originally from Columbia, Utah but lived many other places around the world before returning to Carbon County. “Everyone comes to the table with some baggage and everyone struggles emotionally in their lives. Life is a series of excruciating experiences and there are some people that need more help getting through those than others. So, one of the barriers I have found in this area is that when people work on their mental health, it is seen as a weakness. But that’s not true.”

She said that there is a cultural block in the area where a person that is struggling with individual mental problems is somehow unfit in some way. She said that is one of the things she is trying to change. And, she said oftentimes the strongest people she knows are individuals whose backgrounds would surprise people.

“The strongest person I know is an old Vietnam veteran who is schizophrenic with a heroin addiction,” she stated. “Many would consider this person as weak, but I have been all over the world and I have met a lot of people and I am saying that this gentleman is that very thing. He has been sober for 40 years. That is a huge accomplishment.”

Carter said that most people locally are really good at pointing out when people need physical help, but that isn’t true when it comes to mental illness.

“If someone says ‘I have depression’ or ‘I am thinking about suicide,’ what do most people in this community say?” she asked the group. “We say pull yourself up by your bootstraps. That’s what we do.”

But she pointed out that many mental problems are caused by physical discrepancies in the body, like physical ailments are. She said 70 percent of all depression comes from a lack of serotonin (a substance that causes a sense of well being), that anxiety is often caused by too much nor epinephrine (adrenaline) and that a person that is schizophrenic or bipolar has a body that produces too much dopamine (a pleasure neural transmitter).

“So, if that is the issue, you can see why telling someone to pull themselves up by their bootstraps does not work,” she explained. “There is clearly a clinical issue there.”

Carter said she sees her goal as educating the community on these things. She said she wants people to not see being vulnerable as a weakness.

She also pointed out that when an individual comes to her clinic, they just don’t focus on pills to solve the problem.

“I am not a pill pusher,” she said. “I expect way more from the clients I see. When someone comes to see me, we do a lot of in depth interviewing and questioning. At the end of all that exploration, we are going to talk about medications, the side effects and the benefits and then they can make up their own mind. It is my job to educate the client.”

She said mental well being involves many kinds of things, including therapy, which is difficult because clients are going in front of a total stranger, telling that person all their fears and worries.

“Working on mental illness is incredibly hard,” she stated.

Carter said that she often talks to patients about spirituality and what that means for them (not necessarily religion) and socialization.

“It is not healthy for one to sit in their room or their house all day long and spend the time thinking about themselves and all their problems,” she stated. “Socialization distracts the brain and that is a necessity for good mental health.”

She also said that she also talks to clients about physical exercise.

“I do not have any pills or anything in my bag of tricks that can even compare to what physical exercise can do for a person’s mental state,” she explained. “That alone can reduce anxiety or depression by 50 to 60 percent. It floods the brain with dopamine, which no kind of medication can do.”

She said that mental wellness is also the basis for good physical health.

“A person who is suicidal does not care about their blood pressure problem. A person who is schizophrenic does not care if their thyroid is regulated. That is the reason that good physical health is so dependent on mental health,” said Carter.

Carter also stated that she does work with people who are substance addicted as well. She stated that not everyone who wants to become clean has to spend thousands of dollars on rehab, but many can do it, with help, on their own. Out-patient detox is not out of the question for many, using a series of other drugs that help to replace and mitigate the affects of a detox.

Robinson works with Carter as a life coach. She said being in that position is similar to having a sports coach to improve a person’s athletic skills. But in this case, it is to have them help someone with their life goals and decisions. She said that the inner opponent, they themselves, is the toughest adversary anyone faces.

“That inner opponent can be totally criticizing, totally questioning us all the time,” she said. “A life coach is a professional that helps others reach their goals or helps them to make changes in their life. It helps to have someone to get people on the right track and to help them to feel better about themselves.”

She said that people who hire life coaches must be willing to put in the work and be willing to make the changes they desire. People need to stretch their thinking and taking action is important when committing to be coached. Changes in life, predictable and unpredictable, can benefit from having someone there to coach a person.

“The list of things that can change are endless,” she said. “Some are prepared for changes, and others, no matter what their life experience or educational background, are not. Asking for help should never be stigmatized. It doesn’t mean people are weak, but that a person is experiencing something they have not had to face in the past. Life coaching helps one learn to make the choices that create an effective, balanced and fulfilling change.”

Big Steps Toward a Greener Carbon County

(Pictured left to right: Steve Nelson – Green Team of Carbon County Board of Directors, Terry Johnson – Representative of USU Eastern, Jim Jensen – Manager of Interwest Paper, Ryan Smith – Owner of Recyclops, Larry Jensen – Carbon County Commissioner, Beau Peck – Manager of Interwest Paper, Timm Kennedy – Green Team of Carbon County Board of Directors, Jordan Steele – Co-owner of Office Etc.)

What began as just a few interested citizens coming together in 2009, the Green Team of Carbon County is now making large leaps on improving not only the community of Carbon County but the imprint left on local landfills.

“It’s a culture change, people are just not used to that,” said Jim Piacitelli, Chairman for Green Team of Carbon County. “We are making progress. It has taken us a while to get here but we are excited about what is going on.”

During a Carbon County Commission meeting in September, the Green Team’s request for a semi-trailer to fill with the recyclables collected from smaller trailers located throughout the county was approved. That semi-trailer, provided by Interwest Paper, is placed directly behind the check-in building at the Carbon County Landfill and it is well on its way for its first journey upstate, completely filled and ready to be recycled. But the Green Team didn’t do this all on their own.

Recently, the team has combined efforts with Carbon County Commission, Interwest Paper, Recyclops and Office Etc. to fill up the trailer with a “kill two birds with one stone” method.

Inside the Green Team’s smaller trailers located around town are two gaylord boxes (48”x40”x36”), one near the front of the trailer for office paper and one in the back for newspapers and magazines, along with a small portion at the tip of the trailer for pop cans. These trailers are taken to the landfill occasionally, where the boxes are unloaded by forklift and placed in the semi-trailer. The pop cans are delivered locally to Basin Industries south of Price.

Recyclops, a recyclable curbside pick-up company that stops in Price, Helper and Wellington twice monthly by subscription, will also be packing the trailer after their recyclables have been sorted. The business picks up paper, plastic, cardboard and metal.

“That trailer will fill up faster and that is what we want it to do,” said Piacitelli.

Office Etc. has also joined in the partnership due to their new mobile paper shredding service that began around November. Recently, the business was having Recyclops pick up their boxes of shredded paper, but allowing them to take part in the Green Team’s semi-trailer means less emissions from travel and the economic impact stays in Carbon County.

“This has been a real boost to our efforts by Office Etc.,” said Piacitelli.

Once the trailer is filled, Interwest Paper picks up the trailer along with bringing an empty one. The recyclables in the trailer are transported to a processing center in Salt Lake City where they will be recycled. The office paper will be recycled into office paper, while the newspaper and magazines will be recycled into insulation. Interwest Paper will then pay by the ton for what was recycled.

“Any money we get back from Interwest [Paper], will help us to cover maybe our expenses to run the forklift,” said Piacitelli, considering the Green Team recycling efforts are 100% volunteer related.

By local residents doing their part and recycling every chance they have, it is actually helping the county. For every ton hauled to Republican Services ECDC Environmental Landfill located in East Carbon, the county is charged $24. So, with less waste being hauled to the landfill, the county and taxpayers actually save money.

“There is economic development to it. We are not talking hundreds, thousands of dollars but it is in the positive realm,” said Piacitelli.

Those that are interested in becoming a helpful hand in the growth of recycling in Carbon County can contact Piacitelli at (435) 637-1019, visit the Green Team’s website at www.ccgreenteam.com or visit their Facebook page at “Green Team of Carbon County.”

“It is a great opportunity to meet some great people who have a common interest. I think it is neat because it builds a sense of community and it’s a very worth-while project. This benefits every single person in the county, so when they are involved in this, they are benefiting everybody,” said Piacitelli.

Also, those interested in signing up for Recyclops’ curbside pickup can visit www.recyclops.com/carbon to sign up. Currently, the business only has about 120 homes signed up in Carbon County, according to Green Team of Carbon County board member Timm Kennedy.

“It is a little disappointing to me,” said Kennedy.

Locations of the Green Team’s recycle trailers for paper and pop cans are the USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum, the Sutherlands parking lot, the medical office complex located behind Castleview Hospital, Helper City Hall parking lot, Country Lanes Bowling Alley, Creekview Elementary, Carbon High School, Mont Harmon Middle School’s rear parking lot and Emery Telcom/ETV News on 1st North. The trailer located at Market Express Sinclair on South Carbon Avenue is set up for cardboard recycling.

The Green Team’s future plans are to be able to recycle cardboard. As of now, Walmart has offered to provide the team a bailer to replace the compactor that the county is now using. As of right now, the Carbon County Landfill is compacting cardboard but not by itself. It is being compacted with trash before being shipped out to ECDC. The future plan is for the cardboard to be bailed then sent upstate to be recycled.

Both Kennedy and Piacitelli are very excited in the steps that Green Team is making forward to better Carbon County.

“We are a little behind on the time, but we are working on that,” said Kennedy.

“Traveling Bandit” Bank Robber Suspected of 7 Robberies, Including Price Wells Fargo

The FBI-deemed “Traveling Bandit” bank robber is suspected of seven robberies, including the recent robbery at Price’s Wells Fargo. 

On Jan. 17, the Price branch of Wells Fargo Bank, located at 180 East Main, was robbed, the “Traveling Bandit’s” last stop on a nationwide robbery spree.

“No one was hurt in the incident and the suspect made off with an undisclosed amount of cash,” the Price City Police Department shared. “No customers were in the branch at the time, but a full staff of employees was present.”

The suspect was described as a white, male, 5’10”, about 180-200 pounds, goatee, with hair brown hair and gray highlights in both hair and beard. The suspect was wearing a black hat with a Chevy emblem, blue jeans and a greenish woodland camouflage jacket with a hood.

The suspect got into a cream-colored Ford Explorer, believed to be a Limited model year about 2010. It had out-of-state plates, side window guards, step runners, luggage rack, a sunroof and the front bumper had no plate, just the black bracket. The robbery suspect was the only known person in the vehicle.

Just one week later, on Thursday, Jan. 24, Jason Lee Robinson, DOB 4-7-79, of Kentucky, was arrested at a motel in Fruita, Colo. by Denver FBI special agents in regards to the Price robbery and six others. Robinson was allegedly cooperative with agents.

“Robinson is in federal custody,” the FBI announced in a press release. “Details about his initial appearance in federal court are forthcoming. Asheville Police Department, Aventura Police Department, Mt. Juliet Police Department, Mt. Vernon Police Department, Prattville Police Department, Price Police Department, the South Florida Violent Crime Task Force and the FBI continue their investigation.”

According to court records, authorities were able to identify Robinson following a criminal complaint issued by his ex-wife. His ex-wife reportedly saw a FBI news release depicting Robinson after it was distributed to news agencies nationwide. She called the FBI tip line concerning the news release, stating that the photograph in the release was consistent with Robinson’s appearance.

Court records state that Robinson was convicted in the Eastern District of Kentucky in 2009 on various federal charges. United States Bureau of Prison records reveal that Robinson was on supervised release as of November and was supposed to be restricted from leaving the state of Kentucky. Reportedly, his probation officer advised that when she interviewed him in December, he was made aware of his conditions of supervised release. This included informing the probation officer of any vehicle purchase, employment and/or law enforcement contact. The probation officer reported that Robinson had recently purchased an old Ford Explorer. The last contact the officer had with Robinson was on Dec. 17.

According to court records, Robinson is suspected of robbing seven institutions, including Dec. 28 in Miami, Flor.; Jan. 2 in Asheville, N.C.; Jan. 4 in Johnson City, Tenn.; Jan. 8 in Mount Juliet, Tenn.; Jan. 10 in Prattville, Ala.; Jan. 14 in Springfield, Ill.; and Jan. 17 in Price, Utah.

At this time, the FBI is not issuing further comments regarding the ongoing investigation. Anyone with information regarding this investigation is urged to call the FBI at (754) 703-2000.

Community Economic Council Meets with Local Residents

Four Community Economic Council (CEC) workshops spanned throughout Carbon County last week as events were hosted in Helper, East Carbon, Wellington and Price City. These meetings took place in a town-hall setting and invited residents of each respective community to attend and learn more about the Community Economic Council, give their input and learn more about volunteering opportunities.

The Community Economic Council was organized by the Carbon County Commission following the study done by Lewis Young Robertson and Burningham and the restructuring of both the Carbon County economic development and tourism departments. There are four committees under the umbrella of the Community Economic Council: Quality of Life, Employee Development and Recruitment, New Business Development and Local Business Expansion. Each committee has co-chairs, who also serve on the council, with members from both the private and public sector.

The first meeting of this four-part series took place in Helper. Carbon County Commissioner Casey Hopes started off the meeting by thanking everyone for attending. “We have a responsibility to come together,” Hopes said. He continued by commenting on the progress that Helper has made in recent years, which should “ripple through all the way to East Carbon.”

As a community, focus has been given to job shortages and economic strategies to help fix some of the pressing matters at hand. Gina Gagon of the Community Economic Council spoke about how there are specific challenges that communities are facing that the council aims to address. This meeting, and the subsequent meetings, will help create a path for the council and the community to take. The opioid crisis was addressed as one of the issues that the council is looking to tackle while another dilemma mentioned was a creating a more qualified workforce.

Utah State University Eastern has been putting forth a helping hand by organizing a broader CTE (career/technical education) program. This program facilitates education for individuals who desire to enter the workforce quickly. The program aims to help those people learn and develop skills that will put them into the workforce with qualified skills in a timely manner.

On Tuesday night, the Community Economic Council made its way to East Carbon. Commissioner Hopes began the evening once again by praising the East Carbon rodeo and its impact on the community. He also expressed how appreciative he was for the high attendance of the meeting. After Hopes welcomed attendees, Gagon took the stage as she had in Helper. They followed the same script as the night before, taking questions and feedback along the way, and concluded with the survey.

Wednesday evening found the council in Wellington. Carbon County Commissioner Larry Jensen was present at the meeting as he welcomed those in attendance and introduced the council. Gagon then took time to explain the four struggles the council is focusing on, including lack of skilled workforce, negative public perception, a high reliance on the energy industry and struggles of local business.

Wellington City Mayor Joan Powell took the floor next, highlighting the importance of growth in the local area, even if that means a shift away from the energy industry.

Those in attendance were then encouraged to fill out the survey provided.

The council rounded out the week in Price City on Thursday evening. Carbon County Commissioner Tony Martines kicked off the workshop, talking about the potential development and growth in Carbon County along with his high hopes for the area.

Gagon then spoke briefly before turning the time over to Price City Mayor Mike Kourianos. He explained the importance of creating a vision for the community and the great potential of Carbon County. Those in attendance finished the workshop by completing the provided survey.

The survey packet with questions was available at each meeting and is also available online. These questions were opinion-based, so each individual could answer in their own way. Everyone present was encouraged to participate and engage in the workshop and survey. The questions varied from how an individual would like to describe their community in the next ten years to where they spend time and money. This survey will help the CEC create the steps to improve local communities.

To take part in the survey online, please click here. 

Highway 6 Closes for Helicopter Transport Following Nighttime Accident

Highway 6 in Spanish Fork Canyon was closed on Sunday evening as two separate helicopters landed to transport injured parties following a nighttime accident.

According to the Utah Highway Patrol (UHP), the incident occurred at 8:06 p.m. at mile post 193. At that time, a UHP trooper was providing traffic control for a tow truck that was pulling a vehicle out of a ditch in the southbound emergency lane following a slide off.

“A northbound black vehicle came into the area, lost control and crossed over to the opposite side of the roadway,” UHP shared. “The out-of-control vehicle slid into the front end of the tow truck, The tow driver was at the back area of the tow truck. The front/passenger area of the northbound car impacted the front/right area of the tow truck.”

The 27-year-old driver of the tow truck sustained broken bones in both legs and a compound fracture to one of his legs. The UHP Trooper applied a tourniquet to the compound fracture to stop the bleeding. Also, the 45-year-old female passenger of the northbound car sustained critical injuries.

“Both lanes of SR-6 were closed so two separate helicopters could be landed for the injured,” shared UHP. “The lanes were also then kept closed so UDOT could come and apply sand to the icy roadway.”

The lanes reopened just before 10 p.m.

Names of the parties involved and their updated condition has not been released at this time.

Emery County Jail Bookings January 1-10

DATE NAME CHARGE 1/2/19 HURDSMAN, BRANDIN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/POSSESSION X8, NA-FRAUD, POSSESSION BURGLARY TOOLS, TRAFFIC OFFENSE X2, WEAPONS OFFENSE 1/2/19 MIKKELSEN, UDELL WARRANT ARREST X2 1/4/19 DUNCAN, WHITNEY DUI ALCOHOL OR DRUGS, FALSE INFORMATION OR REPORT, TRAFFIC OFFENSE 1/5/19 BREWER, DARRELL ASSAULT (SIMPLE), SPOUSE ABUSE, WARRANT ARREST, WEAPONS OFFENSE 1/5/19 DEYTON, FRANCES CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE X2, TRAFFIC OFFENSE X2 1/5/19 FRISBIE, NATHAN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE X2 1/8/19 CHRISTENSEN, TANNER 1/8/19 HENDRICKS, ROBERT ALCOHOL OFFENSE, NOT CLASSIFIED 1/8/19 LAMBSON, SEAN ANIMAL PROBLEM 1/8/19 LOVE, MOE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE X2, TRAFFIC OFFENSE 1/8/19 HUNTINGTON, WILLIAM WARRANT ARREST 1/9/19 LOFTHOUSE, AARIK ALCOHOL OFFENSE

 

Carbon County Jail Bookings January 21-27

DENNIS, JARROD 1 21 2019 72-HOUR HOLD 42 PRICE MCKENDRICK, SOPHIA 1 21 2019 WARRANTS 30 PRICE BOULDIN, CLINTON 1 21 2019 POSSESSION OF HEROIN, POSSESSION OF PARAPHERNALIA, RESISTING ARREST, OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE 44 PRICE HUMPHREY, MIRANDA 1 21 2019 WARRANT, OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE 33 PRICE HULLINGS, DAVID 1 22 2019 WARRANTS X7 21 PRICE WORLEY, JARED 1 22 2019 COMMITMENT 35 HELPER LEMON, JERRY 1 22 2019 ASSAULT DV, DISORDERLY CONDUCT DV 30 WELLINGTON BADBACK, MAYA 1 22 2019 COMPUTER CRIMES (F3), THEFT 20 HOMELESS THOMSON, SAMUEL 1 23 2019 WARRANT 21 RIVERTON KNOWLDEN, JODY 1 23 2019 CRIMINAL MISCHIEF (DV), STALKING (DV), RECKLESS ENDANGERMENT, THEFT, FALSE WRITTEN STATEMENT 49 HELPER JENSEN, JOSEY 1 23 2019 PROBATION HOLD/ WARRANT 28 PRICE ALLEN, CHRISTOPHER 1 23 2019 ASSAULT (DV) 32 EAST CARBON GABRIELSEN, DAVID 1 23 2019 HOLD FOR COURT 39 PRICE COOK, DALTON 1 23 2019 WARRANT 18 PRICE DOPORTO, MELCHOR 1 24 2019 WARRANT 43 PRICE PENDLETON, JAMES 1 24 2019 WARRANT X2, POSS. OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, POSS. OF PARAPHERNALIA. 22 PRICE TORRES-GARCIA, JULIO 1 24 2019 5 DAY COMMITMENT 34 HELPER GILES, NATHAN 1 24 2019 THREATS OF VIOLENCE(DV) 22 PRICE CLOWARD, KELLY 1 24 2019 10-DAY COMMITMENT 40 HOMELESS TURNER, BRITTANY 1 24 2019 POSS PARA, DRIVING ON SUSPENDED 30 WELLINGTON YOUNG, DYLAN 1 24 2019 WARRANT X2 23 NORTH SALT LAKE BROWN, JESSIE 1 24 2019 INTOX, INTERFERENCE W/ ARREST, DISORDERLY CONDUCT, POSS. OF PARAPHERNALIA 38 PRICE JONES, KARL 1 24 2019 WARRANT 41 HELPER NEELY, CHARLES 1 24 2019 WARRANTS 38 HELPER SUSTAITA, SAMUEL 1 25 2019 NO INSURANCE, DRIVING ON SUSPENDED 36 CALDWELL ID SCHADE, JOHN 1 25 2019 WARRANT 38 PRICE MENZIES, BOBBY 1 25 2019 WARRANT X 3 45 EAST CARBON LUNDELL, HAROLD 1 25 2019 PROTECTIVE ORDER VIOLATION 62 PRICE LANDER, MICHELLE 1 25 2019 WARRANT X 3 48 PRICE SAMPLES, BRIAN 1 25 2019 WARRANT 38 PRICE HEWITT, ALBERT 1 26 2019 WARRANT 58 SLC LUNDELL, CAROL 1 26 2019 DUI 65 PRICE GURULE, THAD 1 26 2019 INTOX, 72 HR HOLD 25 PRICE LASLEY, TOMI 1 27 2019 WARRANT 30 WELLINGTON SHAW, DANIELLE 1 27 2019 WARRANT, POSSESSION OF METH, POSSESSION OF PARAPHERNALIA 24 PRICE DAVIS, ANNA 1 27 2019 NCIC WARRANT 37 CLEVELAND MCCALLSON, ADAM 1 27 2019 WARRANT 34 EAST CARBON

ECEDC Has Money Available for Emery County Businesses

ETV News stock photo

By Julie Johansen

The Emery County Economic Development Council has grants and loans available for businesses in Emery County that meet certain criteria. At the present time, there is $50,000 in funds waiting for businesses. The Retail Incentive Program (RIP) and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) are ready to provide assistance to retail businesses.

The purpose of the RIP Main Street Incentive Program is to provide assistance on a case-by-case basis to retail businesses located within Emery County that enhance the vibrancy of the overall retail mix of the county. It is a matching grant in which the ECEDC will match up to 50%.

Only retail businesses that are consistent with the goals of the ECEDC and local or county master plans and that strengthen or add to the diversity of the county are eligible. This program is jointly funded by matching grants from the ECEDC and local municipalities. Incentives for website assistance will not exceed $500 and exterior signage and improvement are up to available up to $1,000.

The purpose of the Revolving Loan Fund is to create permanent, long-term jobs within the Southeastern Utah region by providing “gap” financing to qualified businesses. Loans are available in Emery County. Loans made through the RLF are intended to bridge the gap created by shortfalls in commercial financing, such as banks.

RLF participation can be up to 100% of the total project with the cost not to exceed $40,000. Funds are repaid into the program and recycled to other businesses, thus allowing an on-going job creation program. The RLF can loan to both start-up and early-stage businesses. Eligible uses of the capital are land and building acquisition, building construction and renovation, purchase of machinery and equipment, and working capital.

The exact criteria can be obtained from members of the ECEDC, specifically Ethan Migliori ([email protected]) and Jordan Leonard ([email protected]).

New Price City Library Board Members Take Oath of Office

The Price City Library added some new faces to their board during the city’s council meeting on Wednesday evening. Grace Hilliker, Wendy Hughes and Curtis Icard took the oath of office in front of the council.

The council was very excited to add these people to the board. “I want to brag about these three,” Councilman Layne Miller said. “We had a chance to pick one, two or three. All three of them needed to come in. They’re all very well qualified.”

Each new board member introduced themselves to the council and exclaimed their excitement for the positions they’ll be holding.

Amy Richens, who is a current board member, was also in attendance to welcome them aboard.

You’re Invited to the Green River Rock & Mineral Festival

Press Release

Join us the weekend of April 5 in beautiful Green River, Utah, for the third annual Green River Rock & Mineral Festival. The festival will feature talks from local experts, field trips to some of the most spectacular geologic and paleontological sites in the world, as well as a pop-up market featuring rock collectors, artisans and educational booths for kids and adults.

This year’s schedule and specific events will be coming soon. See greenriverrocks.com for up-to-date information.

This festival is FREE to the public and is made possible, in part, by the City of Green River and the Emery County Travel Bureau.

Washington Federal Assists Hundreds of American Families Impacted by the Government Shutdown with its 90 Day Interest-Free Loan

Press Release

On Friday, Washington Federal, Inc. (NASDAQ-WAFD) announced it has helped more than 1,000 American workers either furloughed or working without pay in the first week of its 90-day interest-free loan offer designed to pay their bills through the shutdown. This three month interest-free offer is available to any eligible federal government employee, current customer or not, living within our eight state region for an amount equal to the net take home pay for up to six missed paychecks.  It only requires a Washington Federal checking account, including Free Checking, to provide access to the funds.

President and Chief Executive Officer, Brent J. Beardall commented, “We understand many of our hard-working neighbors live paycheck to paycheck. Washington Federal is proud to step in and help them through this uncertain time and support their financial needs. Clearly, the need is great and we’re happy to be assisting so many families. We will continue to offer this support.”

All interested parties are encouraged to visit one of Washington Federal’s 235 branches in eight western states or go to our website, www.washingtonfederal.com for loan terms and conditions.

Washington Federal, Inc. is the parent company of Washington Federal, a national bank that operates in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico. Established in 1917, the bank provides consumer and commercial deposit accounts, financing for small to middle market businesses, commercial real estate and residential real estate, including consumer mortgages, home equity lines of credit and insurance products through a subsidiary.  Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.

Emery Historical Society Presents 7th Annual Antique Show

By Julie Johansen

The Emery County Historical Society hosted its seventh annual antique show on Thursday evening at Miller’s Landing in Huntington. This event seems to be among the favorites of the organization’s monthly meetings.

January’s meeting appeared to be the night of the tool. Many antique tools were displayed and their stories shared with the crowd. There were other antiques and stories told, including presentations on maps, books, dolls, geological formations, quintuplet spoons and pictures.

Presenters invited to share were J.J. and Cynthia Grant, Dale Andersen, Vaughn Reid, Francis Swasey, Paul Conover, Owen Olsen, Stephen Murdock, Gennie Baggs, Evelyn Huntsman and Clayton Ward. All contributed to a trip down memory lane for the audience.

HEAT Program Still Underway

Press Release

Have you applied for the HEAT (Home Energy Assistance Target) program? There is still funding available in the HEAT program. If you have not yet applied this year and think you might qualify, please contact your local HEAT office at (435) 613-0100. This PSA is from the Utah Department of Workforce Services-Housing and Community Development Division.

Meeting Highlights Activity, Event Agenda for Business Improvement District

Price City Press Release

The Price Business Improvement District Committee met on Tuesday, Jan. 15 and the emphasis within the meeting was the activities and events committee’s proposals.

The Business Improvement Committee was formed last summer to find ways to improve business, particularly downtown, in Price. Subcommittees made up of various business leaders, government officials and others have been formed. Those subcommittees consist of the ambassadors committee (which gathers information and informs business owners of what is going on), the budget committee (which determines the costs of what may be done and where the money could come from), the project committee (which determines the projects, where they will be done and how they will be done), and the activities and events committee.

Whereas past meetings concentrated on projects and funding, this meeting had the representatives of the activities committee present. They presented what they hope to accomplish to make downtown Price an improved and viable place to shop as well as participate in local happenings.

They reported that they want to host an event every other month downtown. They plan on working with the businesses there to gather sponsorships and support for the ideas they have. All of the activities will take place on Main Street, which will be closed between Carbon Avenue and 100 East for each of the events.

The first event is planned for February and will consist of a project for children to make sacks to put their Valentines in. The tentative date for that activity is Monday, Feb. 11 after school is out for early release that day.

Other plans are for future activities include April (Easter themed), June (a school’s out party), August (school begins event), October (Halloween costume event) and December (Christmas craft event). All events will include prizes and drawings for both kids and adults.

The committee also thought that tying the parades that run through town in with businesses would be a good idea as well. Parades through town include St. Patricks Day, International Days and the Carbon High Homecoming parade, amongst others.

More information on each event will be available in ample time for the public to be aware of the times and dates.

Another group at the meeting consisted of Jordyn Gagon and Tyler Yakovich, both of whom serve on the Price Youth Council. They suggested that there is a lot that could be done in the downtown area when it comes to younger people. They suggested a large chalk board be put up on a wall downtown that says something like “Price City is for Dreamers” and then people can write their dreams and hopes on the board. They said they are already scoping out places to put them.

The Price Youth Council members also talked about bringing in electric scooters that are being used in many towns for transportation. The scooters are paid for through an app on cell phones and they said that would draw youth into the area. This would give the students at the university easier access downtown as well. They said there could be an integrated effort along with businesses to have designated parking areas for the scooters. They explained that the company that owns and manages the scooters is looking to move into smaller towns to provide those services and Price fits into that concept.

Next, the ambassador committee reported that when contacting businesses with the ideas the committee has had, 80 percent of the businesses downtown were enthusiastic about what they have heard.

There was also some discussion on the projects that have been discussed in prior meetings. The costs for those and how to finance them are still being assessed as to what those projects would require. The project committee will continue to look at the possibilities.

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