News in Price, Utah

Suspect Arrested in Wells Fargo Bank Robbery

Price City Police Department Press Release

On Thursday at 5:30 a.m., Price Branch Wells Fargo bank robbery suspect Jason Lee Robinson, DOB 4-7-79, of Kentucky, was arrested at a motel in Fruita, Colo. by Denver FBI Special Agents. Robinson is allegedly being cooperative with agents, including relating to the Price incident.

The Price City Police Department would like to extend its thanks to the many citizens who offered remarkably helpful tips, the very professional and competent staff at the Price Branch of the Wells Fargo Bank, our local law enforcement partners, and the several local agencies throughout the country who had similar incidents, and especially our federal partners at the FBI.

Emery County to Host Public Information Meeting

By Julie Johansen

Tori Killian with Emery OHV Club requested a public information meeting to inform local citizens about the Emery County Public Lands Bill during the county commission meeting on Tuesday. She recommended that it be scheduled at a time when most people could attend the meeting. It was decided that the meeting would take place on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 6 p.m. in the Emery County Administration Building in Castle Dale. She also requested support of the congressional bill on the Antiquities Act that would give Utah the same classification as Wyoming and Alaska to prevent a monument designation.

Also at the meeting, Emery County Commissioners pleaded with citizens to sign up to become EMTs. The county is extremely short of emergency personnel to serve the citizens of the county, it was reported. Consequently, a pay raise was granted for all EMTs. Advanced EMTs will receive a $3 per hour hour raise, with basic at $1 per hour and drivers at $.50 per hour. On-call holiday EMTs will be given a $50 stipend for the weekend.

It was also reported at the meeting that the clothing allowance for the weed and mosquito department was raised to $150, which will meet the allowance for other county departments. Ratification and approval of several annual contracts were made during the meeting as well.

Then, Emery County Sheriff Greg Funk reported on the recent avalanche recovery and extended a huge thank you to Larry Johansen from State Parks for all his assistance in the canyon. Funk reported this was the first avalanche in Emery County in over 30 years. The sheriff’s office called for support from Sanpete County, Alta Ski Patrol and other agencies. The Emery County equipment was found to be outdated and needs updating.  Sheriff Funk reported that they are “desert rats” but need to consider equipment for this type of rescue.

To conclude, commissioner Kent Wilson stated that the public lands bill is being backed by Senator Mitt Romney and Congressman John Curtis. When discussing a timeline, commissioner Wilson said it could be in a week or a couple of months, no one really knows.

Savvy Senior: Smart Home Devices That Can Help Seniors Age-In-Place

Dear Savvy Senior,
I recently read an article about how “smart home” devices can help seniors with aging-in-place. What types of smart home products can you recommend that can help with this?
Inquiring Senior

 

Dear Inquiring,

There are actually a wide variety of affordable smart home devices you can add to your home that can help make it safer and easier to live in as you age. Here’s what you should know.

Smart Home Technologies

While most Americans today use technology and enjoy the conveniences they provide, there are millions of seniors who still don’t have much use for it. But you don’t have to like technology or be tech savvy to benefit from the many different smart home automation devices that can help seniors age-in-place.

Smart home devices can also give family members and caregivers the ability to electronically keep tabs on their elder loved one when they can’t be there, which provides peace-of-mind.

If you’re interested in adding some smart home products to your house, you need to know that these devices require home Wi-Fi, and for many of the products, you’ll need either a smartphone, tablet or voice-enabled assistant to operate them. Here are some popular aging-in-place smart home products to help you get started.

Voice-enabled assistant: Popular products like the Amazon Echo (Amazon.com/echo), Google Assistant (Assistant.google.com) or Apple HomePod (Apple.com/homepod) will let you operate compatible smart home products with simple voice commands.

These devices can also play your favorite music, read audiobooks, make calls, set timers and alarms, provide reminders for medications, appointments and other things, check traffic and weather, ask questions, and much more – all done by voice commands.

Smart lights: Falls are common concerns among elderly seniors, which are often caused by fumbling around a dark room looking for a light switch. Smart light bulbs like the Philips Hue (MeetHue.com) can turn on and off the lights by voice command, smartphone or tablet. These bulbs can also dim the lights and you can program them to turn on and off whenever you want.

There are also smart electric plugs like the Wemo Mini (Wemo.com) that offer remote control automation for lamps, fans, or other electrical devices.

Video doorbell: Safety is also a concern for seniors who live alone. Smart doorbells like the Ring video doorbell (Ring.com) would allow you to see, hear and speak to someone at her door (via smartphone, tablet, Google smart displays, Amazon Echo Show or Spot) without having to open it.

Stovetop shut-off: To help seniors prevent home cooking fires, stovetop shut-off devices like the IGuardStove (IGuardFire.com) uses motion sensors to turn off electric and gas stovetops when left unattended for a predetermined amount of time. It will also alert family members via text.

Medication management: Seniors on a complex medication schedule can benefit from a smart medication tracking system like the PillDrill (PillDrill.com) that reminds you when pills are due, tracks that you’ve taken them, and notifies loves ones.

Home monitoring: Family members can keep tabs on older loved ones from afar with smart home video cameras like Lighthouse Al (Light.house/elderly-care) or a smart home sensor system like TruSense (MyTruSense.com).

Other options: Some other helpful smart home products to consider include smart door locks like Kwikset Kevo (Kwikset.com), smart thermostats such as the Nest (Nest.com), and smart nightlights like Aladin (Domalys.com), which detects falls and alerts caregivers.

The costs for most smart home products range anywhere from a few dollars to several hundred dollars and can be found in many local home improvement stores as well as online.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Asphalt or Metal Roofing: Which is the Right Fit in Castle Country?

Asphalt (left) and metal (right) are both popular options for roofing.

By Jeff Hoel, CAS INC

Do you have water stains showing up on the ceiling? Whenever the wind blows, do you say to yourself, “there went another shingle”? It is likely time to do something about it. But what is the best choice of roofing products? Asphalt shingles or metal? Where can you find straight answers and affordable options? From someone who regularly installs both roof types and fully understands each product.

Asphalt Shingles remain the most popular roofing product in the housing industry. Many of us grew up with good-ole three-tab. However, “laminate roofing,” also referred to as “architectural roofing,” has gained in popularity. The elevated texture and color choices have helped beautify residential housing. This shingle has two layers laminated together creating a “nail-strip”. This added strength combined with using a six-nail-pattern results in a 130-MPH wind rating. The cost difference between three-tab and laminate shingles is negligible, which makes it a great choice.

Metal Roofing is becoming increasingly popular for use on residential housing. It is true that some metal roofing products are two or three times costlier than asphalt roofing. However, the most popular and widely used metal roofing product is comparable to asphalt roofing costs. The manufactures of these roof systems promise a longer life expectancy then asphalt. Metal roofs reflect 70% of the sun’s energy, unlike asphalt shingles, which retain heat and drive up cooling costs. Some may say that metal roofs are noisier when it rains, or they attract lighting. These claims are simply unfounded, just like the notion that a metal roof is too expensive.

At CAS INC we will “do-the-right-thing” by helping you create a customized roofing-plan that best fits your home and budget. Ask us about our popular “Help-you-roof” program. We provide tools and training so you can save thousands or more by removing your own roof. Our customers are eager to share their success story directly with you, including those who selected the “Self-Help” option.

It important to remember that a building permit is required for all roof replacements. This will protect you from liabilities resulting from using unlicensed and uninsured contractors.

Give Jeff a call or text at (435) 650-6841 or visit www.JEFFisOK.com for more information.

CVSSD Honors Retiree Dave Mangum For 36 Years of Service

By Julie Johansen

Board members of the Castle Valley Special Service District (CVSSD) honored retiree David Mangum at their January meeting.

Mangum retired from CVSSD after more than 36 years of service on Nov. 1. He began his career on June 15, 1982. Mangum worked with the Ferron crew, serving Ferron, Clawson and Emery Town. He became the foreman of the crew in 2011 and remained there until his retirement.

The CVSSD described Mangum as a hardworking, quiet leader and a very knowledgeable water treatment plant operator. He was certified with the State of Utah water operator certifications higher than what was required for his position. The certification requirements are based on the population of the cities that are served.

At the meeting, the district thanked him for over 36 years of dedication and service to the citizens of Emery County and presented him with a plaque of appreciation.

USU Eastern to Host Craig Jessop

Press Release

Dr. Craig Jessop is coming this weekend as a guest conductor for a combined choir of USU Eastern and community singers. The group will be accompanied by Elise Tuttle, select community instrumentalists and USU Logan music faculty. The concert is free to the public and begins at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 26 in the newly remodeled Geary Events Center. Seating is limited, so you will need to arrive early to get a seat.

Dr. Jessop is the Dean of The Caine College of the Arts for all USU campuses, and will soon be stepping down as dean at the end of this school year. He has already done much to support and strengthen the arts at USU Eastern, but wants his outreach to extend to our community at large. His visit to Price will include a community lecture and two days of workshops and rehearsals, culminating in the free performance. Dean Jessop will give a lecture for the university and community called “The Power of Music” on Thursday, Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the Geary Events Center.

Many know Dr. Craig Jessop for his many years as director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir (now called the Tabernacle Choir on Temple Square). However, his distinguished resume also includes solo work, having won auditions at the Metropolitan Opera and San Francisco Operas. His decades of experience directing some of the most elite choirs and bands across the United States and Germany make him famous and have resulted in the most coveted music awards. His work as a much sought after guest conductor have taken him to the most prestigious concert halls around the world.

On Jan. 26, Dr. Jessop can add the Geary Events Center to his long list of prestigious venues. And thanks to generous donors, the Geary Theater now has a Steinway Concert Grand Piano Model D to make this and all future music events scintillating.

As a student of music himself, Craig Jessop has had the opportunity to sing under the most legendary choral directors Helmuth Rilling, John Rutter and Robert Shaw. Those experiences, along with three music degrees from USU, BYU and Stanford, have given him a wealth of experience to draw from and help shape his own career as conductor. And soon, he will be providing our community and USU Eastern Choirs with a similar opportunity to learn from one of the best.

The performance this Saturday will include two combined choir selections by John Rutter, “For the Beauty of the Earth” and “All Things Bright and Beautiful.” They will also sing a spiritual, “Let Me Fly,” arranged by Robert DeCormier, and two Mack Wilberg arrangements of “Cindy” and “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” The concert will also feature musical selections by the Logan Canyon Winds Ensemble and a solo performance on the new Steinway concert grand piano.

BODEC to Present at BEAR Meeting

Tony Martines

BEAR Press Release

The speaker for the general Business Expansion and Retention (BEAR) meeting on Jan. 31 will be Tony Martines from BODEC, a local electrical contractor that serves clients throughout the West.

From the beginning of the company’s operations in 1996, BODEC, Inc. has acquired a team of professionals who supply a full range of services for electrical projects. In conjunction with its sister firm, Bruno Engineering, P.C., the company employs electrical engineers and a large number of licensed electricians.

From project coordination to planning, permitting, design, contract preparation, equipment procurement, construction management and project close-out, the firm is committed to providing their customers with a customized construction experience with the technical expertise to back it up.

The presentation will take place at the Jennifer Leavitt Student Center Alumni Room and it will start at 8 a.m. and last about one hour. The public is welcome.

Light refreshments will be served at the session.

Final Helper Train Depot Meeting Hosted for Community Input

The final meeting for the Helper Train Depot Pedestrian Corridor Project was hosted by the Helper Project and Downtown Development on Thursday evening. Local community members or anyone who was interested in the project was invited to attend and give their input.

The primary use for one of these corridors is safety and parking. The funding is provided by donations and the Helper Project is “very grateful for the money donated from locals.” So far, more than $50,00 has been funded.

Ben Levenger distributed surveys to locals about the plans for two corridors and asked which would be most appreciated in the area. Most people preferred the idea of having one corridor over having two of them.

This project is for the safety of the Helper community and the railroads. The project developers have created two options. The first is a one-way street. This would be a corridor to maximize space available for pedestrians and provides more parking opportunities for those who are residents or visitors of local businesses.

The second option is a two-way complete street. This corridor maximizes transportation or vehicular integration, while providing the largest amount of parking. This would increase parking alternative options for residents and businesses.

Both plans were available for the audience to view and evaluate. Anyone who attended the meeting was able to share their thoughts and concerns about the project. Downtown Development wants to make sure that the community is in favor before any plan is put in motion. There were markers and paper available for participants to comment on what they would like to see or ask questions.

Downtown Development and the Helper Project spoke with Senator David Hinkins and mentioned that he thought this project was a good idea and wants to help along the way. They now want locals to speak up, ask questions and give their personal input.

“This is just the beginning,” Levenger said. “It takes time.” He was very excited for all the comments made as they will help them take steps in the right direction to make the community more safe and content.

The plans are available on their websites, that way anyone who was unable to attend the meeting can view the plans and ask questions or give their input. Ben Levenger said that this is the “first step to many more.”

Carbon County Chamber Celebrates Local Businesses with Annual Installation Banquet

The Carbon County Chamber of Commerce celebrated local businesses and those that make them possible at the 2019 installation banquet on Thursday evening.

During the event, the chamber took time to honor businesses that made a significant impact on Carbon County throughout the past year. First to accept recognition was Naturally Inspired, which was deemed the chamber’s “Best in Fest” winner for the past holiday season. Naturally Inspired is one of Price City’s newest businesses on Main Street. There, customers can find men’s and women’s clothing and accessories, handmade skin care, jewelry crafted by local artisans as well as handmade home décor.

For the best small business award, Wilco Supply was recognized. Wilco Supply is owned and operated by Max Jones, a Carbon County native. Jones was familiar with the industrial and construction community and worked for several suppliers in the area before deciding to start Willco Supply in 2013.

Then, Sutherlands was welcomed to the front of the crowd to accept the best big business award. Kyle Heffernan and his team accepted the recognition. Heffernan has been with Sutherland for 27 years and has managed the Price location for 15 months. In 2018, the local Sutherlands store donated to over 80 different events and organizations.

Next, Intermark Steel’s Matt Blazer received the most innovated business award. Founded in March 2016, the steel fabrication and erection business was created after 29-year-old Blazer quit his job and connected with Pro Carbon to bring his vision of Intermark Steel to life. Since then, the business has had a hand in two Amazon distribution centers, Alta View Hospital, the Salt Lake International Airport, the stadium at Arizona State University and three temples for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Individuals who have made an impact on local business and the community as a whole were also recognized. Terry Willis accepted the honor of the community involvement award. Willis is not only a successful artist, but also part of many community organizations, including the USUE Prehistoric Museum, Soroptimist International and United Way of Eastern Utah. She has also been involved in local politics and currently serves on the Price City Council. Her experience also extends to the Community Progress Board, International Days, and Price City Planning and Zoning.

Next, Kerrie Barker was honored as the outstanding board member of the year for the chamber. Barker has served the chamber since 2015. She was credited with making sure countless chamber events run efficiently all while providing a positive attitude and desire to better the community.

Another board member, Jana Hopes, was recognized with the president’s choice award. Each year, the chamber president selects an individual, business owner or board member who does outstanding work not just for the chamber, but the community as a whole. Hopes received this recognition due to her innovation to expand her business, Carbon Print and Design, while also completing countless hours of volunteer work, religious responsibilities and family commitments. She also received praise for improving the chamber’s marketing and budget.

Time was also taken by the chamber to thank local media outlets for their constant coverage and support of the chamber. Castle Country Radio, AJB Broadcasting and ETV News all accepted recognition. Then, special attention was given to the Sun Advocate for its dedication to providing news to the Castle Country area for 127 years. Richard Shaw, former publisher of the Sun Advocate, produced a video explaining the history of the newspaper, which was presented to those in attendance. The chamber took extra time to thank the Sun Advocate and the many employees throughout the years for their dedication.

Finally, before the evening came to a close, the chamber welcomed the 2019 executive board. Serving as president will be Colleen Loveless of Loveless Ash. Barbie Haeck of Peczuh Printing will serve as the vice president. Kerrie Barker of GMS Mine Service will serve as the secretary while Jana Hopes will step into the role of treasurer for 2019. Ryan Murray will serve as the immediate past president.

The entirety of the board was then welcomed to the front of the crowd to take their oaths of office. Darin Birch, Ann Anderson, Jenn Colosimo, Tim Frame, Robert Oliver, Amanda Paiz, Danielle Howa-Pendergrass and Richard Tatton will all serve as board members. Judge Jon Carpenter presided over the oath as the evening came to a close.

Locals Make Plea for Carbon County Senior Center

Michelle Goldsmith presents to commissioners of behalf of the Carbon County Senior Center.

The Carbon County Commission Chambers were packed with concerned seniors on Wednesday evening as they made a plea to commissioners to restore the local senior centers to full operations.

With recent budget cuts county-wide, the tough decision was made to decrease services offered through the Carbon County Senior Center in both Price and East Carbon. According to commissioner Casey Hopes, who served on the commission when the difficult decision was made, the cutbacks were not isolated to just the senior center. Hopes explained that all departments were asked to find a way to cut their budgets by a significant percentage. Then, department heads proceeded to explore options to make that possible.

For the Carbon County Senior Center, the decision was made to completely close the Price and East Carbon centers on Fridays. This means that there are no meals for seniors, with the exception of those receiving Meals of Wheels, and no Friday activities, such as bingo. This also resulted in a decrease in hours for center employees. The change went into effect on Jan. 1.

Michelle Goldsmith was joined by a number of senior citizens as she made a plea to commissioners to reverse this decision during the meeting on Wednesday. Her presentation began with a short video highlighting the many benefits provided by the center, such as nutritious meals, social activities, exercise, a sense of community and more.

“Our goal is to convince you to amend the budget and bring back Friday activities,” Goldsmith said. “There is a concern that closing the East Carbon and Price City centers on Friday is costing the community money as seniors’ mental and physical health is compromised. The senior centers’ primary focus is health, nutrition and socialization.”

Goldsmith reported that there are 3,420 seniors in Carbon County, and at least 450 seniors attended the centers in November. Goldsmith explained that of those seniors, not all that need nutrition qualify for the Meals on Wheels program, making the fact that lunch is no longer offered on Fridays at the center detrimental.

The presentation continued as Goldsmith spoke about mental health. She credited the centers for providing a safe place during the day for seniors as well as a micro-community to provide support for one another.

“Friday to Monday is a long time for someone who is depressed,” she said.

Goldsmith also commented on the health services provided at the centers such as blood pressure, diabetes and hearing screenings as well as exercise classes, health fairs and more.

To end her presentation, Goldsmith encouraged commissioners to seek additional revenue sources, such as the Silver Sneakers program, a fitness program for Medicare beneficiaries, as well as grants and fundraising. She also suggested planting a garden to decrease food costs and increasing the daily recommended lunch donation to bring in additional revenue. Finally, Goldsmith asked commissioners to consider cutting other parts of the county’s budget, such as employee travel, county cell phones and commissioners’ salaries, to offset costs.

The floor was then turned over to the commissioners for comment. The commissioners expressed the financials struggles the county is facing, resulting in budget cuts county-wide.

“The realities of it are that the county right now has 47 millions dollars worth of debt on buildings and projects to the county,” Commissioner Tony Martines said. “The mineral lease money has gone from anywhere from 15 down to two million. So, it is like you took on a new job but had the same debt but your revenue wasn’t the same.”

While commissioners expressed that no immediate changes can be made to bring the centers back to operating at full capacity, they pledged to continue looking for solutions to the revenue problem.

“We are going to do our best to make this area better, which in turn will make the senior center better as well,” said Martines. “We don’t have any good answers for you right now, but we aren’t going to make any promises we can’t keep either.”

Commissioner Hopes and Jensen echoed Martines’ statement.

“I don’t know what the answers are,” Commissioner Casey Hopes said. “There are no easy answers with the budget being how it is and the mineral lease monies being how they are. It is going to take some effort and patience to get everything fixed.”

Beehive Homes Have New Owners, Names

By Julie Johansen

Recently, Dallen and Molly Skelley purchased the Beehive Senior Living Homes in both Price and Elmo. The Skelleys live in Texas but previously resided in Elmo for nine years.

The full-care assisted living centers also boast a new name: Good Life Senior Living. They are part of a parent company by the same name, owned by the Skelley family. This company has 22 units in Utah, New Mexico and Texas.

These senior living facilities house 16 patrons and their motto is “Quality Custom Care.” Celene Woodward is the administrator for both location. The Skelleys have traveled to Utah at least once monthly for the past months since purchasing the homes.

The homes are located at 1025 West 470 North in Price and 15 West 100 North in Elmo. For more information, call (435) 636-4483 in Price or (435) 653-2555 in Elmo.

Carbon County Jail Bookings January 14-20

DRUMM, JESSE 1 14 2019 90 DAY COMMITMENT 47 HOMELESS PRETTYMAN, PANTHER 1 14 2019 15 DAY COMMITMENT 29 PRICE MUNCY, MACEE 1 14 2019 WARRANT 27 PRICE BOSTWICK, DONALD 1 14 2019 WARRANT x2 24 PRICE PASSARELLA, TANNER 1 14 2019 3-DAY COMMITMENT 25 HELPER DUNN, JAIME 1 14 2019 WARRANT 35 PRICE OLSON, ROBERT 1 14 2019 WARRANTS X2 29 PRICE MCMILLAN, BRENT 1 14 2019 INTOX 23 HOMELESS GREGERSEN, BOE 1 15 2019 WARRANT 20 GREEN RIVER, WY SITTERUD, SHANTEL 1 15 2019 WARRANT 23 PRICE JACKSON, BRANDI 1 15 2019 WARRANT 43 EAST CARBON MENZIES, SIERRA 1 15 2019 WARRANT X5 22 WEST VALLEY REHART, RYAN 1 15 2019 CRIMINAL MISCHIEF (DV), DISORDERLY CONDUCT (DV) 31 WELLINGTON CARTER, TIMOTHY 1 15 2019 AGGRAVATED ASSAULT, CRIMINAL MISCHIEF 57 PRICE TRUJILLO, KYLE 1 16 2019 COURT HOLD 29 PRICE VIGIL, KEITH 1 16 2019 WARRANT 28 PRICE PACHECO, TOMMY 1 16 2019 COURT HOLD 25 EAST CARBON HUNT, JONATHAN 1 16 2019 CRIMINAL TRESPASS 38 PRICE PARKER, DARYL 1 16 2019 WARRANT 31 PRICE JENSEN, WILLIAM 1 16 2019 72-HOUR HOLD AP&P, THREAT OF VIOLENCE – DV, ASSAULT – DV, DISORDERLY CONDUCT 32 PRICE TORRES-GARCIA, JULIO 1 17 2019 5-DAY COMMITMENT 34 PRICE PALACIOS, MANUEL 1 17 2019 ASSAULT (DV), 72-HOUR HOLD 32 SUNNYSIDE OTTERSTROM, CARLYLE 1 18 2019 2-DAY COMMITMENT 46 EAST CARBON ALDABA, RICHARD 1 18 2019 72-HOUR HOLD 31 PRICE DAHLBERG, KEVEN 1 18 2019 WARRANT 36 PRICE JONES, MERRISSA 1 18 2019 WARRANT 26 HELPER ONSTOTT, ROBERT 1 18 2019 WARRANT 28 HELPER MCDONALD, HAYDEN 1 18 2019 WARRANT, POSS HEROIN, POSS C/S X2 19 SUNNYSIDE VALENZUELA, JORGE 1 18 2019 INTOX, CRIMINAL MISCHIEF (DV), AGGRAVATED ASSAULT (DV) X2, UNLAWFUL DETENTION 21 PRICE SUNTER, MARTIN 1 18 2019 WARRANTS 23 HELPER JONES, LARRY 1 18 2019 WARRANT, 72-HOUR HOLD, POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE X 2, POSSESSION PARAPHERNALIA, 15-DAY COMMITMENT 34 PRICE DOUGHERTY, HEATHER 1 19 2019 INTOXICATION, DISORDERLY CONDUCT 49 KENILWORTH PITTMAN, WILLIAM 1 19 2019 WARRANT 25 PRICE JOHNSON, JUSTIN 1 19 2019 WARRANT 31 PRICE WILHELMI, DONNELLE 1 20 2019 WARRANT 50 SALT LAKE CITY SHIELDS, AUSTIN 1 20 2019 DISORDERLY CONDUCT, PARAFERNALIA 18 PRICE MARTINI, JACK 1 20 2019 DISORDERLY CONDUCT, INTERRUPTION OF A COMMUNICATION DEVICE 58 PRICE

February is Bald Eagle Month in Utah

DWR Press Release

February is the best time of the year to see one of the country’s most iconic birds.

Bald eagles fly to Utah in the winter to find food and escape colder conditions farther north. By the time February arrives, hundreds of eagles are in the state.

You can see the eagles, and learn more about them, during Bald Eagle Month.

Seeing the eagles is free. Spotting scopes will be available at the various locations, but if you have your own scope, or a pair of binoculars, please bring them with you. You can see eagles during the following days and times:

Feb. 2

Northeastern Utah

Ouray National Wildlife Refuge, near the refuge headquarters in Randlett at 19001 E. Wildlife Refuge Road

Viewing on Feb. 2 takes place from 9 a.m. to noon.

To reach the site, travel on U.S. 40 about 14 miles west of Vernal, or about 13 miles east of Roosevelt, and turn south on state Route 88. Travel south on SR-88 for 14 miles, and then turn left into the refuge entrance. The refuge headquarters is one mile down the entrance road.

The Ouray National Wildlife Refuge and the Division of Wildlife Resources are co-sponsoring the event.

Southwestern Utah

Rush Lake Ranch, 9600 North on the Minersville Highway (SR-130). The ranch is about 12 miles north of Cedar City.

Viewing on Feb. 2 takes place from 8 a.m. to noon.

Feb. 9

Northern Utah

Salt Creek Waterfowl Management Area (Compton’s Knoll), located about 10 miles northwest of Corinne

Viewing on Feb. 9 takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

To reach the Salt Creek WMA, exit Interstate 15 at Exit 365, and travel west on state Route 83 through Corinne.  Stay on SR-83 until you get to 6800 West (Iowa String). Turn right on 6800 West, and travel north to 6800 North. Once you reach 6800 North, the WMA’s Compton’s Knoll Watchable Wildlife site will be on your left side.

The Division of Wildlife Resources and Wasatch Audubon are co-sponsoring the event at Salt Creek.

Northern Utah

Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area, located on the west side of Farmington at 1325 W. Glovers Lane (925 South)

Viewing on Feb. 9 will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to seeing a wide variety of birds, you can enjoy special activities at the Eccles Wildlife Education Center that day. The center is on the north side of the WMA, at 1157 S. Waterfowl Way.

Activities run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They include getting close to a live bald eagle in the conservation hall and taking your kids into the wetland discovery classroom, where volunteers will help them make an eagle-themed craft.

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can learn more about bald eagles at programs offered in the auditorium. A new program starts every hour. Visit the conservation hall welcome desk to see the topics that will be presented.

Eagle viewing will happen on the WMA from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Spotting scopes will be set up, and biologists with the DWR and volunteers from Wasatch Audubon will be on hand to answer your questions.

Farmington Bay WMA Manager Jason Jones says it’s always a guessing game regarding the number of eagles that will be at the WMA on the day the viewing event happens. “Hopefully,” he says, “good numbers of eagles will be available to see. Even if eagle numbers are low, there should still be plenty of ducks and tundra swans to view.”

The Division of Wildlife Resources, Wasatch Audubon and HawkWatch International are co-sponsoring the Farmington Bay event.

Central Utah

Fountain Green State Fish Hatchery, located east of Nephi

Viewing on Feb. 9 takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free tours of the Fountain Green State Fish Hatchery will also be offered.

If you’re coming from the north, you can reach the hatchery by taking Interstate 15 and exiting the freeway at the second Nephi exit (Exit 225). After exiting the freeway, turn east on state Route 132 and travel about 10 miles. About one mile before the city of Fountain Green, a Bald Eagle Day sign will point you to an access road that leads to the hatchery.

Once you reach the hatchery, you’ll receive a driving map of the Sanpete Valley that highlights the best areas in the valley to view eagles. Literature, displays and bathroom facilities will also be available at the hatchery. Spotting scopes will be set-up at a nearby location where eagles often gather in a large tree. The viewing site is about one mile from the hatchery.

Get a close look

Matt Bartley, Wildlife Recreation coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources, says spotting scopes will be available at each viewing site so you can get a good look at the eagles. “If you have any challenges spotting the eagles,” he says, “our biologists and volunteers will help you find them. We’d also be happy to answer any questions you have.”

You can also pick up a free Bald Eagle Month button.

Items to bring

If you attend any of the events, dress in warm clothes and bring waterproof boots. Also, if you want to take photos of the eagles, bring a telephoto lens.

“You need a telephoto lens to get good, close-up shots of the eagles,” Bartley says. “The eagles will be fairly close to the viewing sites, but you still need a telephoto lens to get good photos of them.”

More information

If you have questions about Bald Eagle Month, call Division of Wildlife Resources offices in Ogden, Springville, Vernal or Cedar City.

Body Of Missing Skier Recovered *Photo Gallery*

Emery County Sheriff’s Office Press Release

Search crews have recovered the body of the skier who was buried by an avalanche Friday afternoon in a remote area north of Electric Lake in Emery County. The victim has been identified as 26-year-old Michael Besendorfer of Nephi, Utah.

Crews conducted an initial search Friday night, but conditions were deemed too dangerous and the search was suspended at midnight. The search by ground and air resumed Saturday morning after UDOT crews blasted some unstable slopes in the search area. Utah Avalanche Center monitored conditions as searchers were inserted by air, on snowmobiles, timber sleds, snow cats, skis and snowshoes. A search dog and handler were flown in, and teams from Alta Ski Resort and Wasatch Back Country Rescue responded to offer their expertise.

Besendorfer’s body was located around noon on Saturday after the search dog, Lucy, indicated on an area. Wasatch Back Country Rescuers positively located the body based on Lucy’s indication, and recovery efforts began.

Emery County Sheriff Greg Funk extends a huge thanks to all agencies involved in this search. It was a combined effort by Emery County Sheriff Search and Rescue, Sanpete County Search and Rescue, Utah DPS helicopter crew, Utah State Parks, UDOT, Forest Service, Utah Avalanche Center, Wasatch Back County Rescue and Alta Ski Resort. Conditions were difficult and ECSO is grateful for the safety of all involved in the search and recovery effort.

The Emery County Sheriff’s Office extends sincere condolences to the Besendorfer family during this difficult time.

 

 

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