Romney’s stance on immigration is counterproductive

Mitt Romney is running for U.S. Senate
Posted Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 1:13am

Mitt Romney is running for U.S. Senate from Utah and his stance on immigration is counterproductive to his own goals. He goes against precedent by trying to make hard working people’s lives more difficult.

Romney wants a merit-based process for immigration. His web page says people that speak English, have a trade skill, personal savings and advanced degrees should get citizenship. During Price city’s Lincoln Dinner he explained, legal immigrants should be able to see where they are on the list to naturalization, and how many years you have to wait. With DACA recipients have a total different pathway.

At the dinner, Romney said if a DACA person wants to be naturalized they must join the military or “teach America”. He wants to take away House Bill 343, which allows DACA students to pay in-state tuition.  When he used the term teaching America, no context was provided. If he wants people to teach others then he needs to make college more affordable, instead he is making it more expensive.

These views on immigration create a false image of a better America, while aimed to preserve elitism. When you raise the price of college for DACA students, you limit their class mobility, which keeps money in the hands of the few.

Service requirements for legal status just gives eiltest more power to fight wars that are best for the elitist class, because it is an easily justified form of exploitation that has mass appeal. When there is mass appeal, there is little to no questions asked about the methodology. This means they would be forced to do things no one would make their children do because they are winning their freedom.  

Romney is holding children responsible for their parents actions by saying that DACA recipients broke the law, if they knew it or not. Being at a young age, parents have complete autonomy over the their children. Meaning the action may not have been commented by children.

It is often overlooked that a DACA child life is in the U.S. They may or may not have family in their respective countries, but their school, friends, work history are here. Forcing them to go to a county they did not live their life in is hitting a reset button that digs a grave for them to climb out of.

The question is, why make the lives of hard working people more difficult? In answering this question, consider the benefits and the consequences and it will be shown making people work harder is not always good.

Filed under: viewpoints

Comments